Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a setup of an OSX Server environment with 4 servers running across two networks:

  • Private XSan Metadata network (configured by XSan as 10.0.10.x/255.255.255.0)
  • Private management network (configured manually as 10.10.0.x/255.255.255.0)

We are seeing a lot of 'hanging' and the spinning beachball when ever we open Server Admin or similar (e.g. XSan Admin) and I am wondering if its possible that the networks overlapping is causing some issues?

If so, is it possible to change the XSan management network settings to something else like the 172.x network space?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your subnets are not overlapping. However, if you're trying to contact your device on 10.0.10.0/24 and your server is on 10.10.0.0/24, and there is no route between the two, then you'll never contact it, except by broadcast. Which is to say: if they don't live on the same subnet, you'll never get them to talk to each other easily until you get a router between the two.

What you may want to consider is moving both subnets into a larger network, segement them accordingly, then appoint a machine as a router between them, i.e.

  • Master network as 10.1.x.x./255.255.0.0
  • XServe on network 10.1.1.x/255.255.255.0
  • XSan on network 10.1.2.x/255.255.255.0
  • There needs to be at least one machine with an address in 10.1.1.x, another address in 10.1.2.x, and also a route between the two

Better yet, if you have multiple servers attempting to contact multiple SANs, drop the entire idea of private subnets and just make everything in the same subnet, i.e.

  • Master network as 10.1.x.x/255.255.0.0
  • XServes at 10.1.1.x/255.255.0.0
  • XSANs at 10.1.2.x/255.255.0.0

Using this method, you can easily determine what IP serves what purpose, while still being able to contact it on the same subnet.

share|improve this answer

The networks are not overlapping. They are completely distinct. Perhaps you are thinking of them as overlapping becuase they are both in the 10.0.0.0 space, as a Class A network? It really shouldn't matter, because networks haven't used that kind of classification for quite a few years now.

But you might try changing the management network to 10.10.1.x/255.255.255.0 because some network software has problems with the "0 subnet".

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.