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I am planning to do a POC and setting up OpenStack in nonCommercial setup.I do not want to go with Devstack.I am confused as to how much is the minimum processor requirement if i plan to setup openstack on a Laptop (having single VM instance).Can i Use a quadcore processor or do i need to have a dual quadcore.My intention is i do not want to procure a ne server unless it is actually required.I want to rather check if i can use any other existing laptop and get the work done.Really appreciate an answer with the specifications.

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Depends on what you are doing.

OpenStack supports multiple virtualization / container solutions.

It's original support was libvirt which meant KVM / Qemu.

If you want to do any sort of hypervisor virtualization ( IE vmware esx, kvm, xen ) you will need a CPU that has virtualization extensions ( Intel VT or AMD-V ). This can be seen in /proc/cpuinfo as 'vmx'. Note that this usually needs to be enabled in bios.

However, if you are emulating as with qemu without kvm... anything will do. Usually the limiting factor in virtualization isn't CPU, it's ram. You will probably want a server with as much ram as you can afford to stuff in.

All this being said... there's another newer solution. Docker. Or more appropriately, LXC. AKA Linux Containers. OpenStack now supports deploying Docker style linux containers.

What this gets you isn't really a VM... so much as the ability to replicate a seperate instance of your HOST OS. So if you are on ubuntu 12.04... you can spin up a bunch of isolated 12.04 linux instances and do whatever you want to them without impacting the host. The benefit here is you don't need VT extensions, and you don't need to really virtualize at all. It's pretty snappy.

So, what's your intended use profile?

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