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Due to changes in the LAN router, I had to modify the static IP of one of our servers. It still succeeds in finding the external world (ping google.com), but only temporarily - when I access one of the websites hosted in that server through a browser, if that website tries to access google.com, for example, ping stops returning successful requests.

All computers can still ssh into the server, the problem seems to be DNS-related only: the server itself can't connect to the outside through domain names reliably.

/etc/network/interfaces

[...]
# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
auto eth1
iface eth1 inet static
        address 192.168.0.53
        netmask 255.255.255.0
        network 192.168.0.1
        broadcast 192.168.0.255
        gateway 192.168.0.1
        dns-nameservers 8.8.8.8 8.8.4.4

/etc/resolv.conf

nameserver 8.8.8.8
nameserver 8.8.4.4
search phub.net.cable.rogers.com

Restarting the networking daemon or even rebooting the computer didn't solve the problem. Also, I don't think that the dhcp daemon is overriding any of those configs, because the problem remains even when I explicitly stop the client.

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1  
I am not at all convinced that the issue you are describing is related to DNS. I suggest you fire up tcpdump to check though.. tcpdump -ni any port 53 –  Zoredache May 1 at 17:27
    
Hi Zoredache. I got a huge output from tcpdump, ending with the following: 10 packets captured 10 packets received by filter 0 packets dropped by kernel –  noobeana May 1 at 17:35
    
I'm with Zoredache, this is almost certainly not a DNS issue. –  Jed Daniels May 1 at 18:59
    
This statement is confusing: "when I access one of the websites hosted in that server through a browser, if that website tries to access google.com, for example, ping stops returning successful requests." Can you please elaborate/explain it differently? –  Jed Daniels May 1 at 19:00
1  
Yes. The easiest way would be to shut down the interface on the server with the problem and try to ping that address. If you get a reply then its confirmed. If you don't, look in your ARP table to see if it shows up there. –  yoonix May 2 at 1:38

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