Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After building my website, I realized that our RAID is setup so that all of the space is allocated in /home/admin/ folder.

For that reason I copied all of my websites from /var/www/ to /home/admin/www/. I also chmodded the directories like so:

sudo chown -R root:root /home/admin/www/website.com/public_html

sudo chmod 755 /home/admin/www

I then restarted nginx and all systems showed green, but now I am getting a 403 error upon accessing my websites.

Here is my virtual.conf file:

server {
    listen       80;
#    listen       *:80;
    server_name  website.com www.website.com;
    access_log   /home/admin/www/html/website.com/public_html/access.log;
    error_log    /home/admin/www/html/website.com/public_html/error.log;

    location / {
        root   /home/admin/www/html/website.com/public_html;
         index  index.php index.html index.htm;
    }

    # pass the PHP scripts to FastCGI server listening on 127.0.0.1:9000
    location ~ \.php$ {
        include /etc/nginx/fastcgi_params;
        fastcgi_pass  127.0.0.1:9000;
        fastcgi_index index.php;
        fastcgi_param SCRIPT_FILENAME /home/admin/www/html/website.com/public_html$fastcgi_script_name;
    }

}


server {
    listen       80;
#    listen       *:80;
    server_name  website2.com www.website2.com;

    location / {
        root   /home/admin/www/html/website2.com/public_html/;
         index  index.php index.html index.htm;
    }
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Try to chown http:http -R /home/admin/www to the http user. –  drewrockshard May 10 at 20:09
    
Yes now I remember, I think I had the same issue before and chodn http:http solved it I think. However this time, I'm getting invalid user: 'http:http' –  pufAmuf May 10 at 20:16
    
Do: cat /etc/passwd and check if there is some sort of "web" user. You can also check nginx config to see what user it is using which could also be an issue. –  drewrockshard May 10 at 20:29
    
hmm there isn't, other than ftp or nginx that I could think of. Is there a command to find out what users are attached to my old /var/www/? –  pufAmuf May 10 at 20:42
1  
Yes - on your old vps do ls -ld /var/www. You can also check your backed up files to see if there have a UUID and then match that up with your old vps. Check your nginx config file on your new vps (nginx.conf) and you should check the top of the file - should have a user set. If that user does not exist (id $user_from_nginx_config) then you need to add the user to the system, which would be the issue to your problem. Let me know how it goes. –  drewrockshard May 10 at 21:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.