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I'm using Ubuntu and I have a few keys which i'm using to connect to remote machines. The key I created using ssh-keygen -t rsa is located in my home folder at ~/.ssh/ and called rsa_id. I have another key which is being used by the DevOps team in my company and I want it to become the default key. I've looked at the file /etc/ssh/sshd_config and there's this line there:

HostKey /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key

So I was wondering about two things:

1. When I issue my key using the command specified above, does it copy the content of my newly created key to this file?
2. If I want to change the default key used, shall I add another `HostKey` line and point it to the DevOps key?

Thanks

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closed as off-topic by MadHatter, Jenny D, mdpc, dawud, Jacob May 28 at 2:46

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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You may be at risk of confusing the system's key with the user's key; the one in /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key identifies your system, not you as a user, and has nothing to do with sshing into remote systems. –  MadHatter May 26 at 7:48
    
Thanks MadHatter. –  Itai Ganot May 26 at 7:57
    
I don't understand why the question has been voted down... –  Itai Ganot May 26 at 7:57
    
Mouse over the down arrow; the popup says "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful". Downvotes without comment may be presumed to be for at least one of those reasons. –  MadHatter May 26 at 8:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Hi I believe this is the answer to your question. I did not want to copy paste the answer.

http://superuser.com/questions/263405/how-do-we-specify-an-ssh-default-identity

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