Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I keep getting these messages in one of my servers kernel logs (which is responsible for file operations). I wonder if anybody knows how serious are these issues. I cannot use smartmontools because the disks are handled by a 3ware card which has it's own (very limited tw_cli utility).

[2522065.275739] sd 0:0:1:0: [sdg] CDB: 
[2522065.275741] Read(10): 28 00 2e 90 97 f8 00 00 08 00
[2522065.275750] end_request: I/O error, dev sdg, sector 781228024
[2522065.281091] Buffer I/O error on device sdg, logical block 97653503
[2522065.287157] sd 0:0:1:0: [sdg] Device not ready
[2522065.287163] sd 0:0:1:0: [sdg]  
[2522065.287166] Result: hostbyte=DID_OK driverbyte=DRIVER_SENSE
[2522065.287168] sd 0:0:1:0: [sdg]  
[2522065.287170] Sense Key : Not Ready [current] 
[2522065.287174] sd 0:0:1:0: [sdg]  
[2522065.287176] Add. Sense: Logical unit not ready, cause not reportable
[2522065.287179] sd 0:0:1:0: [sdg] CDB: 
[2522065.287181] Read(10): 28 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 20 00
[2522065.287190] end_request: I/O error, dev sdg, sector 0
[2522065.291147] Buffer I/O error on device sdg, logical block 0
[2522065.291147] Buffer I/O error on device sdg, logical block 1
[2522065.291147] Buffer I/O error on device sdg, logical block 2
[2522065.308465] sd 0:0:1:0: [sdg] Device not ready
[2522065.308465] sd 0:0:1:0: [sdg]  
[2522065.308465] Result: hostbyte=DID_OK driverbyte=DRIVER_SENSE
[2522065.308465] sd 0:0:1:0: [sdg]  
[2522065.308465] Sense Key : Not Ready [current] 
[2522065.308465] sd 0:0:1:0: [sdg]  
[2522065.308465] Add. Sense: Logical unit not ready, cause not reportable
[2522065.308465] sd 0:0:1:0: [sdg] CDB: 
[2522065.308465] Read(10): 28 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 08 00
[2522065.308465] end_request: I/O error, dev sdg, sector 0

Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You can use smart values: for example:

 smartctl -a -d 3ware,2 /dev/twe0

Qouting the manpage of smartctl:

Under Linux and FreeBSD, to look at ATA disks behind 3ware SCSI RAID controllers, use syntax such as:
          smartctl -a -d 3ware,2 /dev/sda
          smartctl -a -d 3ware,0 /dev/twe0
          smartctl -a -d 3ware,1 /dev/twa0
          where in the argument 3ware,N, the integer N is the disk number (3ware ´port´) within the 3ware ATA RAID controller.  The allowed values of N are from 0  to  31  inclusive.   The  first  two
          forms,  which  refer to devices /dev/sda-z and /dev/twe0-15, may be used with 3ware series 6000, 7000, and 8000 series controllers that use the 3x-xxxx driver.  Note that the /dev/sda-z form
          is deprecated starting with the Linux 2.6 kernel series and may not be supported by the Linux kernel in the near future. The final form, which refers to devices /dev/twa0-15,  must  be  used
          with 3ware 9000 series controllers, which use the 3w-9xxx driver.

          Note  that  if the special character device nodes /dev/twa? and /dev/twe? do not exist, or exist with the incorrect major or minor numbers, smartctl will recreate them on the fly.  Typically
          /dev/twa0 refers to the first 9000-series controller, /dev/twa1 refers to the second 9000 series controller, and so on. Likewise /dev/twe0 refers to  the  first  6/7/8000-series  controller,
          /dev/twa1 refers to the second 6/7/8000 series controller, and so on.

For some ideas about your question:

This might not yet be a full blown issue with the HDD/SSD, but i suggest changing it ASAP.

Make backups if you not have done it yet!

You can check for a problem with something like:

e2fsck -fv /dev/sdX

If you see reallocated sectors within smart you should change the drive in my opinion.

share|improve this answer
    
I second the statement about the reallocated sectors. When a drive starts doing that, they don't last long. –  Halfgaar Jul 17 at 8:53

You can access the smart information using (for example):

smartctl -a -d 3ware,N /dev/twa0

N is the port nr, twa0 the controller.

With the following you can obtain some interface error statistics:

smartctl -l sataphy -d 3ware,N /dev/twa0

With that command, I was able to determine that 'ata exceptions' I kept getting in my logs were the result of interface/cable errors, because the CRC counts increased (which ultimately required replacing the disks with a different type. Replacing the mainboard with the same type didn't help). Looking at it, a normal SATA controller gives you more information than a a 3Ware port.

As for the 'buffer error', I've never had that one, so I can't speculate. I have had numerous 'ata exceptions' in the past (on software RAID), which was almost always a precursor to failure. Therefore, I scan my logs for that now.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.