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Anyone please help! Today is 3rd day that I'm banging my hand to solve this problem.

So the situation is, I've inherited a project which worked on SQL Server 2000, later client decided to upgrade the server. Now its SQL Server 2005, and here's a problem:

The SQL users' password in SQL Server 2000 is case insensitive and there are many little submodules written maybe 10 years ago, where the connection string is hardcoded and compiled(missing source codes). So I'm not able to edit the connection string, and as the password was case insensitive the developers weren't used password in right case. The right case kept only in few modules.

So I want to find a way to change the password policy for SQL Server 2005, or create multipassword user (I don't think its possible), or maybe you can suggest me a different way to solve this.

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1 Answer 1

I don't think there's anything you can do to change SQL server's behavior regarding password sensitivity.

I think you first would want to be sure you've exhausted all efforts to locate the source code for those modules. Otherwise, Here are a couple of ideas:

  1. Use a hex editor to edit the binary executable files to change the password to the correct case.

Assuming the exes or dlls were created with VB6, there's some information in this thread and probably a lot of information on Stackoverflow (and/or that would be a good place to ask the question about hex editing to update a password). It may be easier if they are .NET apps.

Obviously this is something to approach very carefully, with backups of everything before attempting to make any changes.

  1. It may also be possible to downgrade to Sql Server 2000 and restore the database - that would be another idea to research.
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