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Good day. I just want to ask a question regarding membership of a computer to a domain.

Currently, my setup is I have a domain controller (test.domain.com) on a network with IP range 10.10.0.0/16. I have a server (ServerX) on the same network, which I recently joined to test.domain.com.

After joining ServerX to the test.domain.com, I transferred the network connectivity of ServerX, and it now belongs to IP Address range of 192.168.0.0/16.

Now, the question is, will ServerX for some reason disjoin itself from test.domain.com after being unable to contact the domain controller for a certain period of time?

Sorry, I was not able to find any documentation providing clear statement about my query, but thanks in advance.

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Q: Now, the question is, will ServerX for some reason disjoin itself from test.domain.com after being unable to contact the domain controller for a certain period of time?

A: No.

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So, should a server be no longer able to contact the domain controller, it's domain membership stays? If you don't mind, is there any document pertaining to this where I can refer? Thanks! –  user3465501 Jul 18 at 15:22
1  
@user3465501 It's just how active directory works. After a while, AD will gravestone (trash) the computer account, but the computer itself will have no idea and cannot "unjoin" itself unless you tell it to. –  Nathan C Jul 18 at 15:46
2  
Joe is correct. Without an admin taking explicit action, a domain-joined computer will always think that it's in the domain. You won't find any documentation regarding at what point the computer turns into a unicorn, because it's not a thing that happens. –  mfinni Jul 18 at 15:47
    
I see, thanks for clarification. Have a nice day. –  user3465501 Jul 18 at 16:01

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