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What is the difference between a ProxyPass directive:

ProxyPass         /     http://localhost:8080/ nocanon
ProxyPassReverse  /     http://localhost:8080/

And a <Proxy> directive:

<Proxy http://localhost:8080/*>
    Order deny,allow
    Allow from all
</Proxy>

In Apache configuration files?

I often see these two in the same virtualhost section, an I am not sure what is the difference.

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Why the downvote? I think this is a valid and clear question. –  Adam Matan Aug 3 '14 at 7:16
    
Probably nobody knows that, but the only we can do against this to compensate for others. –  peterh Aug 3 '14 at 9:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With the ProxyPass (link) directive, you define a proxy in the first place. The <proxy ...> (link) section can contain processing directives for the proxied content. This is something you can learn yourself by just reading the docs, hence the downvotes.

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1  
Many questions can be answered by "just reading the docs". I think that if the question is useful for others and uses accurate technical terms, it should not be downvoted. –  Adam Matan Aug 3 '14 at 7:46
1  
I disagree. Reading the docs is the professional first step. If this answers the question, it's not useful. Also "Does not show any research effort" is one of the principal downvote reasons, it's even the "alt text" for the downvote link/arrow. –  Sven Aug 3 '14 at 7:53
    
Is there a link to specific place which answers this question? If so, I think you are right. If not, and understanding this issue requires synthesising a few sources, I think that the question is valid. –  Adam Matan Aug 3 '14 at 8:26
    
There are two links in my answer, but I admit the shitty ServerFault color scheme doesn't make this too obvious. I'll edit to make it clearer. –  Sven Aug 3 '14 at 8:33
    
+1 I disagree with your downvote, but thanks for the answer. –  Adam Matan Aug 3 '14 at 8:48

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