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The question is simple: how widespread is Vista in corporate environments. It seems more companies and end users I see are using XP. Are there many companies out there that have adopted Vista enterprise wide? Are they the minority?

On a similar thread, are most companies you work with planning on upgrading to Windows 7? Are they planning to wait until Windows 7 SP1 is released?

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The question is simple: how widespread is Vista in corporate environments. It seems more companies and end users I see are using XP. Are there many companies out there that have adopted Vista enterprise wide? Are they the minority?

Of the past organizations I've worked for in the over the years, it's rare to see Vista in the enterprise. I've been at a large enterprise (10k+ users worldwide), to small-medium businesses (< 1000 users) and they all still use Windows XP Pro. My friends all use XP at their work as well. To date, I don't know (directly) anyone using Vista at work.

Personally, I think it's a good thing. At least IT organizations aren't bullied or conned into upgrading into Vista for no good reason. XP works just fine.

On a similar thread, are most companies you work with planning on upgrading to Windows 7? Are they planning to wait until Windows 7 SP1 is released?

So far I've heard nothing from my current employer. I think this may be due largely to the fact of the current economic times and not the actual OS itself, but I'd also argue that Windows 7 is definitively a 'wait-and-see' type product as well.

Windows 7 is undoubtably more intriguing than Vista (even though the bar is set so damn low) but I think people are (finally) getting wise to the point of letting other people go through the headaches, driver issues, security patches and service packs. Odds are, I'd say corporate IT is more likely to upgrade to Windows 7 in comparison to Vista given enough time to prove its maturity, stability, reliability and overall security. And lest we forget, XP's support is nearly at an end. At some point, organizations will have to upgrade in order to get support from Microsoft directly.

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To these eyes, it looked very much as though Vista took a lot away (app compatibility, driver trouble, UAC issues, etc) and didn't offer nearly enough in return. The extra security features are certainly good, but there was nothing that really made me think "oh wow, I must upgrade to this OS". The killer was a business critical app that crashed and burned every time.

At one stage I was seriously considering whether migrating from XP to Linux would actually cause less hassle and grief than upgrading from XP to Vista would.

Windows 7 looks like it's going to be viable though; that crashing app works just fine on it even without any compatibility options and without needing to go to XP mode. Overall it just fixes everything that was wrong about Vista. Tests of the beta and RC indicated that the whole OS is just rock-solid and nice to use.

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It depends on the size the company and what type of industry you're trying to compare. I work for a software company of about 200 employees and everyone is either running Vista, Windows 7 or Redhat. Larger companies and those with less technical users will wait much longer before deploying Vista or Windows 7. It seems like those types of companies are generally one major release behind.

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