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How can I get Bacula to move the tape to the IO slot after it has ran a specific job?

I run daily backups with Bacula since a couple of days and I was wondering if I can do this kind of thing. I've already specified the UseVolumeOnce = yes directive in the configuration files, but now I want to know if I can make Bacula move the tape to slot 24 (I/O slot) when the job finishes.

Can bacula do this or do I need to script it? If I need to script it, do you have experience with that?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Without having the same environment to test with, I'm not certain this will work, but a script like this called via the RunAfterJob directive in bacula-dir.conf should work:

#!/bin/sh
#
echo "unmount <device-name>" | <bacula-path>/bconsole -c bconsole.conf

If you want to avoid calling external scripts, you might experiment with the AlwaysOpen, RequiresMount/MountCommand/UnmountCommand, and/or OfflineOnUnmount directives. All of these are in the Device resource of your Storage Daemon configuration.

Also, can you clarify why this is desirable for you? Perhaps there's a solution to the root problem we're overlooking.

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I've found something similar on the web and I'm using it with success. It's not ejecting to the IO slot, but it's useable. The reason I want this is because a daily backup is only half a tape, but company policy requires a tape to leave the building every day. –  Gert M Jun 1 '09 at 20:32

I have set up an admin job called Eject that runs the following script at priority 1000, so it is executed once all of the backups are finished:

You could also run it as a "RunAfterJob" option for a specific job.

#!/bin/bash

MAXATTEMPTS=3
STORAGE=StorageName
DEVICE=/dev/sg3
CODE=0

OUT=`mktemp /tmp/XXXXXX`

###########################################################################
## Eject the tape from the drive and determine which slot it ended up in ##
###########################################################################
STATUS=1
ATTEMPT=0
while [ $STATUS -ne 0 ] && [ $ATTEMPT -lt $MAXATTEMPTS ]; do
  echo "umount Storage=$STORAGE"|/usr/sbin/bconsole >> $OUT
  if ( grep "Command Failed" $OUT > /dev/null ); then
    STATUS=1  
    echo "Command Failed!"
    rm $OUT
  else
    STATUS=0
    cat $OUT
  fi
  ATTEMPT=$(( $ATTEMPT + 1 ))
done
SLOT=`tac $OUT|grep -m1 3307|cut -d" " -f6|cut -d, -f1`  # Find the last occurrence of the success message only
rm $OUT

if [ "x$SLOT" = "x" ] || [ $STATUS -ne 0 ]; then
  echo "ERROR: Unable to unmount drive after $ATTEMPT attempts"
  exit 1
else
  echo "Slot $SLOT unloaded from Drive-0 "
fi

###########################################
## Move the ejected tape to the I/O slot ##
###########################################
STATUS=1
ATTEMPT=0
while [ $STATUS -ne 0 ] && [ $ATTEMPT -lt $MAXATTEMPTS ]; do
  /usr/sbin/mtx -f $DEVICE transfer $SLOT 24
  STATUS=$?
  ATTEMPT=$(( $ATTEMPT + 1 ))
done
if [ $STATUS -ne 0 ]; then
  echo "ERROR: Unable to move tape from slot $SLOT to I/O after $ATTEMPT attempts"
  CODE=2
else
  echo "Tape moved from slot $SLOT to I/O"
fi

#################################
## Ensure the DB is up to date ##
#################################
echo "update slots Storage=$STORAGE"|/usr/sbin/bconsole > /dev/null
if [ $CODE -ne 0 ]; then
  exit $CODE
fi
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You do have to script it, but the combination of Bacula and a recent version of MTX makes this not too painful.

Take a look at the "Run Before Job" and "Run After Job" 'Job' parameters to call your the script you've written. We've tended to favor calling a script that runs a command into bconsole (through input redirection) to unmount your tape volume, and then call MTX to move the tape around.

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