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In IIS 6.0 I need to create host headers to host multiple websites on our web servers. We are using network load balancing manager to have a clustered web farm of three servers. Given that we use the internal ip address of the "group" of servers, how do I set up a host header for the internal IP address? Is the header composed of the internal IP address of each node machine or the ip adress of the server "group?"

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You will need to create records in your DNS for the new web site names, referring to the IP address that the web farm answers for.

The "Host Header" is the host and domain name entered in the "Address" bar of the browser. (Beware that both the fully-qualified and unqualified names need to be entered as host hedaers if the users will be using both.) Configure host header entries on each of the web servers in the farm for the new web site names, listening on whatever IP address the load balancing solution will send incoming requests to.

If DNS is directing clients to the farm IP address and all the farm web servers have the proper host headers entered things should work as you expect.

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So for instance if address to the web farm is 192.168.1.1 and the three nodes are .1.2, .1.3, .1.4 will each of them need a host header entry for 192.168.1.1 or their respective address? –  Achilles Oct 26 '09 at 17:21
    
Host headers are used to host multiple web sites on the same IP address and TCP port. They don't have anything to do with IP addresses, per se. You'll want to put the name that the client computers will use to access the new web site as the host header entry, not the IP address referred-to by that name in DNS. –  Evan Anderson Oct 26 '09 at 22:35

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