Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm not sure this is the right place to ask but...

I'm working on installing network and telephone wiring in a office rental property (I'm working for the landlord) The networking is going fine but I'm a bit lost with some of the phone side. Ultimately what I need to know is what is it going to take (cash and time) to get 6 phone lines hooked up? I can tell from looking at the old stuff that there has been at least 3-4 lines hooked up (but not active until the renter sets that up with Verizon) at some point and looking in the phone box on the side of the building, I can see a bundle of 6 twisted pairs that I think goes to the telephone pole, so I'm hopeful that everything is in place so they can just turn it on back the the switch room. The problem is I'm not knowledgeable enough to be sure.

I'd really like a reference I can read up on that would answer my questions because I'm sure I'll have more soon enough.

Specific questions:

  • Should Verizon have on record how many lines (all inactive right now) are installed to some address?
  • Are all 6 wire pairs in the box telephone lines, or might one pair be power/ground? (All but one have one white wire.)
  • Might some of those pairs not be hooked up at the power pole?
  • What will the phone company have to do to hook up the lines? Change a setting in the switch room? hook up some wires on the outside of the building? Hook up some wires on the pole?
  • Will the cost and hookup time depend on the answer to the above?
  • Where is the point of presence and can I hook to it even if the isn't active yet?
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Every installation is different, so you'll have to contact your local telco to get the details, but in general you should find:

  • Should Verizon have on record how many lines (all inactive right now) are installed to some address?

Yes.

  • Are all 6 wire pairs in the box telephone lines, or might one pair be power/ground? (All but one have one white wire.)

All 6 are going to be local loop - which is essentially a regular phone pair.

  • Might some of those pairs not be hooked up at the power pole?

It's possible, but unlikely unless they were running short on loops at the pole.

  • What will the phone company have to do to hook up the lines? Change a setting in the switch room? hook up some wires on the outside of the building? Hook up some wires on the pole?

It depends on the customer termination point - they may have only installed as many customer termination jacks as originally ordered, even though the wires going to the building may have more loops available. Some telcos will come out to the premises regardless as part of their normal process (more profitable).

  • Will the cost and hookup time depend on the answer to the above?

Yes. But businesses generally get better/faster service than residential, so you won't be dealing with the telco in the same way and in the same timeframes you may expect as a home user.

  • Where is the point of presence and can I hook to it even if the isn't active yet?

There is a termination box either outside where the wires meet the building, or inside where the wires go into he building. It's obvious that the box has two halves that can be opened independently, with one marked "For -telco name- use only" and the other side being easy to open and wire into.

You can hook into it now, but if the loop isn't terminated properly at the local telco office then any equipment you hook up to that line is going to be at higher risk for electrical discharges (not just lightning, but many other things will cause huge charges to build up). It's best to wire everything to a termination point near the box, but leave the box disconnected until the phone company indicates that everything's done. Then you should test each line before connecting your own equipment.

-Adam

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice answer! Thank you. However I think I might be dealing with older stuff. The box on the outside is just stamped rusty sheet metal with big greasy binding posts. (The building is about 70 years old.) –  BCS Nov 2 '09 at 21:10
1  
Wow. In that case either 1) the telco will NOT come out (as they obviously haven't before) or 2)they will replace that box with a real termination box when they do come out (or, I suppose, they'll take one look and charge you $$$ to upgrade the old installation, and when you pay them they won't actually upgrade it, like they haven't for the last 70 years, and they'll laugh all the way to the bank) –  Adam Davis Nov 2 '09 at 21:34
1  
I don't know of a single resource for this type of information, though. It's something, I suppose, that is gained through experience and passed on from installer to installer... –  Adam Davis Nov 2 '09 at 21:35
    
I don't think the box is 70 yrs. old. I'm guessing more like 20-40 yrs. The building has been added to several times and the point where the wires enter the house has moved at least once. –  BCS Nov 2 '09 at 21:49
1  
The telco loop is a very, very, very forgiving system (being that it's based on current loop, rather than voltage loop) so if the "big greasy binding posts" are sufficient for the telco, they might leave them as is. I won't appreciably affect your phone lines. However, since you're going from 6 to 8 lines in the building they may replace it. It's up to them - although you can specifically request a new customer termination/access point, but they'll charge you for it. The grease is a dielectric insulator to prevent corrosion so they can use cheap contacts (not gold plated). –  Adam Davis Nov 3 '09 at 5:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.