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If I allow multiple logins (ie, user "test" can login more than once) and a user doesn't log off, but leaves the sessions open, eventually the server will not allow any new logins (once the max is reached) - even for the user "test".

  • How do I re-connect to a "dangling" session?

It appears that under some circumstances the remote desktop will only attempt to start new sessions, rather than reconnecting to the old sessions.

-Adam

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suspect you have to reconnect from the same PC that you originally connected from. Not sure though. I've seen the same behavior. As regards the mstsc syntax Microsoft in their wisdom decided to change the switch from /console to /admin from Vista onwards for console sessions.

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If you are locked out because of too many sessions, I think you might still be able to connect to the 'console' session. I am not sure of the syntax to do this windows, but if using remote desktop from Linux you can use rdesktop -o serverName. You can then kill sessions by going to 'Terminal Services Manager' in administrative tools, right click the session and select disconnect.

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Syntax for RDP console is: mstsc /v IP Of Server /admin –  Sam May 14 '09 at 15:39
    
Shouldn't there be a /f:console or something like that on there? –  Harper Shelby May 14 '09 at 15:45
    
/admin only for Vista onwards –  Martin Rennix May 14 '09 at 15:58
    
No console access - I don't know why, but it doesn't appear to allow it. –  Adam Davis May 14 '09 at 16:21
    
its /admin for vista onwards, and any client with RDP version 6 or above installed. Prior to that the switch is /console –  Sam May 14 '09 at 18:29
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