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I have been using Analog to analyze the logs of our Apache web server. While analog is quite powerful, I find it quite tedious to set it up correctly to get the information that you want.

My question is: Do you know any (perhaps more "modern") tools to analyze web server log files? Preferably these would be tools running on the web server machine itself, which in my case is a Debian Linux system.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I've been fairly happy with AWStats

They've got a demo page set up here for a quick example.

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Ubuntu has an awstats package, so I suspect Debian may as well. Makes things nice and easy... –  ceejayoz May 14 '09 at 19:04
    
+1 for awstats. It just works, and even supports combining load balanced site logs, which is a real plus. Plus I used it to replace an OLD WebTrends set of reports, and thus far have been able to get more information out of awstats (with some plugins) than I could with WT. –  Milner May 14 '09 at 19:12

Maybe try out piwik its a Google Analytics clone that easy on the eyes, and has several plugins for adding additional functionality.

demo site can be found here: http://piwik.org/demo/index.php

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Piwik needs its own database; it does not analyse server log files. –  Arjan Oct 18 '09 at 10:41
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Piwik has a log-importer with which you can import log files from almost any webserver and analyze the data later. –  halfdan Mar 14 '13 at 15:07
    
I like the idea of Piwik, but every time I've thrown real logs at it, it has choked. Just ran 11M lines for 45 days of logs through it, and the resulting database was ~5GB and even after doing table optimizes and analyzes, it couldn't load any of the widgets within the timeout. Piwik seems to be more suitable for very small sites. –  Sean Reifschneider Oct 10 at 19:55

I quite like http://www.summary.net/ - it costs, but a free 30 day demo is available.

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I like AWStats a lot also, but if you are looking for another suggestion there is also a very modern log analyzer called Mint. It is not free, but the cost is very nominal, $30.

The interface is very sleek, similar to google analytics, but it runs locally and provides real-time statistics. Also, it has a huge list of plugins available.

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Mint does not parse existing webserver log files. It uses a web bug instead, exactly like Google Analytics or Piwik (piwik.org). –  joschi Jun 6 '09 at 12:24

For completenesss, I'll also throw in a suggestion of Webalizer, although it's been a while since I used it last. (My more recent experience has been with the already-mentioned AWStats.

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+1 for completeness (I also prefer AWStats to Webalizer) –  David Z May 14 '09 at 21:19

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