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I've noticed that my laptop machine keeps dropping packets in what seems to be a random manner (192.168.1.1 is the router):

C:\Users\Ree>ping 192.168.1.1 -n 20

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=8ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=8ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=9ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
General failure.
General failure.
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=4ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=8ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=4ms TTL=64
General failure.
General failure.
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
General failure.
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=4ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
General failure.
General failure.
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=6ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:
    Packets: Sent = 20, Received = 13, Lost = 7 (35% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 1ms, Maximum = 9ms, Average = 4ms

This seems to happen at random times of the day (for example, as I post this, no packets are lost). Other machines with wired connections to the same router do not seem to have this problem. Could this happen because of some kind of wireless interference (neighbouring access points, for example)? I'll try changing the wireless channel of the router later, but before I do, I thought I'd ask here first.

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2 Answers 2

Or boiling a kettle, turning on a microwave, cordless telephone. The wireless frequency is very busy frequency. I would personally try swapping channels, run a wireless sniffer and see what channel in unpopulated and use that. You don't mention what the wireless adapter is but may be worth your while updating its drivers and seeing if that improves the situation. Does the adapter have a external aerial, if so is it attached correctly? Is there lots of traffic on the router, low powered 'home' routers can't handle mass amounts of 'traffic' (Although open connections would be closer to the truth, bittorrent for example)

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It means that connection is lost, I don't think that it is because of interference (try using channels 1-6-11, they do NOT overlap), but rather poor signal power.

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The signal is always strong. During my tests the laptop was located just 3 meters away from the router. –  Ree Nov 16 '09 at 9:49
    
Check router load, turn off security. Check connection with another notebook and router. –  TiFFolk Nov 16 '09 at 10:19

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