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I'm building a linux server using SuSE version 11.1 and I want to run Apache, SNMP, DHCP and SSH. Machine will also be functioning as a router/firewall. I want to run as few services as possible. Currently I have these services that start-up in rc3 and I want to remove the unnecessary ones. Is there anything that I can disable?

acpid                
apachectl            
auditd               
cron                 
dbus                 
dhcpd                
earlysyslog          
fbset                
haldaemon            
kbd                  
network              
network-remotefs     
nfs                  
nscd                 
ntp                  
postfix              
random               
rpcbind              
smartd               
snmpd                
splash               
splash_early         
sshd                 
stopblktrace         
syslog
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only one you likely don't need is nfs, but that won't hurt the overall system performance if you keep it: by default, nothing is shared, and the daemon idles.

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So basically nothing to remove.. :) –  Lipis Nov 26 '09 at 13:21

And what about SNMPD, NTP and POSTFIX?

With SNMPD I'm sure that's safe to turnoff. You'll only need it if you intend to monitor the server using snmp.

I'm not really sure about NTP and POSTFIX. As far as I know, NTP is network time protocol, so if you don't intend to sync it with other devices, should be safe. And POSTFIX is an email solution, isn't? So, I think that's safe also.

Regards,

Bob

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I'm going to monitor the server using snmp so I'm keeping SNMPD.. and it's always a good idea to keep your time synchronized.. But I'll check on POSTFIX.. thank you! –  Lipis Nov 28 '09 at 18:35

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