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We've moved most of our website log files from C: to a data volume D:, however we have a LOT of websites, and some are still logging to C:

I'd like to generate report on which sites these are so we can move the logs to D: which has the space to cope with the expanding volume.

Thoughts: I can see a whole lot of website IDs in C:\WINDOWS\system32\LogFiles directory, but I don't know how to determine the site from the ID, nor whether the site even exists any more. (The non-existent ones can be archived somewhere else)

EDIT: I'm asking about a pre-existing tool rather than asking how to write my own. The problem is not yet worthy of writing something.

If the solution can be adapted to report on other pieces of IIS information that would be great.

Cheers. Murray.

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Dec 1 '09 at 18:38

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I don't know about IIS, but isn't the location to log to something that is determined in some central configuration file? Also, maybe you can determine which logs are used, and which aren't, by their "Last modified" date? –  Pekka 웃 Nov 29 '09 at 21:05
    
Yes, and Yes, seems obvious now :-] (the file you're referring to is the metabase, in IIS6 it's here %systemroot%\System32\Inetsrv\MetaBase.xml) –  Myster Nov 29 '09 at 21:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Credit to Pekka for pointing out the obvious, I'll write it up here.

To find all the sites logging to C: you can search the meta base XML file (%systemroot%\System32\Inetsrv\MetaBase.xml) for the string "C:\WINDOWS\system32\LogFiles\" or your equivalent.

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