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I have a LAN of Linux computers that get access to the Internet over NAT. The gateway runs a restrictive firewall. I have ICMP echo requests and replies allowed to pass through the firewall on the gateway, so I can ping any external host from a LAN computer, but mtr and traceroute to an external host hang at the gateway hop.

What additional firewall rules should I have so these tools would work properly?

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Linux traceroute uses UDP by default, on a random high port, while Windows tracert uses ICMP. For your Linux machines, you'll either need to configure the firewall to allow UDP on high ports, or use the -I commandline switch to specify the use of ICMP ECHO instead of UDP datagrams.

Edited to add: By default, it picks a random port in the unassigned ports range, commonly referred to as "high ports". Typically this means a port in the 49152–65535 range (see this port list). The man page refers to this as an "unlikely value" for a service to be running on inadvertently, since we don't actually want the host to process the UDP datagrams as information. If you want, you can specify the port with -p, but be aware that it will increment the destination port by 1 with each probe when using UDP. If you want to use a constant port, specify the -U switch (default port is 53 for this). Alternatively, if you don't want to use UDP or ICMP, you can use the -T switch to specify TCP SYN mode, which will use a constant port that you can set with -p. Then you would open that port on your firewall.

Only UDP is allowed for unprivileged users.

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I assume "high ports" is supposed to mean a certain port range, is this documented somewhere? –  Anonymous Dec 2 '09 at 9:17
    
See my edit. You can look up the traceroute man page if you want to know more. –  phoebus Dec 2 '09 at 9:33
    
Thanks, traceroute -I did the trick, I also had to allow ICMP "time exceeded" (type 11) in my firewall (I had only ICMP echo requests and replies allowed as I stated in my question). I've also read the man page for traceroute one more time and I couldn't find anything about a -T switch there. May I know what OS do you use and what version of traceroute do you use, just for general knowledge? –  Anonymous Dec 2 '09 at 9:41
    
I'm using traceroute version 2.0.9, Nov 19 2007, on Ubuntu 8.04 LTS. –  phoebus Dec 2 '09 at 9:52

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