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I have been using Linux for a while. But i could not understood what does the folder

/var

/etc

actually means

Why sometimes the same file is at many places like

/bin/sh

/sbin/sh

and other basics especially the structure of directories. Why they are used

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a much better description of the filesystem. http://tldp.org/LDP/Linux-Filesystem-Hierarchy/html/Linux-Filesystem-Hierarchy.html

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Mirror51, this page gives a good overview.

Each linux distro has some subtle difference from the others, but for the most part, they all adhere to roughly the same file structure.

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Thanks for that , that has eveything i want to learn. –  John Dec 9 '09 at 3:54
    
That link is a bit off in some of it's descriptions. I read it and thought /sys and /dev were incorrect and the comments at the bottom of the article seem to echo my concerns. Which is really odd b/c it's a debian admin document. –  3dinfluence Dec 9 '09 at 3:55
    
You're welcome. I'm glad to accumulate rep for these type of answers, but you may just want to try googling for these before asking - this link was the third result after googleing for "linux filesystem structure". –  EEAA Dec 9 '09 at 3:56
    
It also doesn't mention /proc –  3dinfluence Dec 9 '09 at 3:56
    
Yah, you're right, there has to be a better explanation out there than that... –  EEAA Dec 9 '09 at 3:58
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In every Linux distribution you'll have a man hier man page that describes the filesystem hierarchy :)

In short, /etc is for configurations & admin scripts (those that initialize your system). /var is for variable content in common. /bin is used for common system applications, /sbin are those apps that usually require root (superuser-bin). Also there's /usr/bin for binaries installed by the user.

Cheers! :)

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+1 for very short & useful explanation. –  risyasin Jun 23 '10 at 6:08
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