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I have a linux machine on which I occasionally run Windows XP in Virtual Box. All runs wonderful, except for the openvpn in XP, which can't connect to the vpn server running on a remote machine. The vpn client works from linux ... as far as I read until now it seems to be a problem of port forwarding ... I keep getting this error: TCP/UDP: Incoming packet rejected from 10.0.2.2:1194, expected peer address: (allow this incoming source address/port by removing --remote or adding --float) , but have no idea how to fix it.

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closed as off topic by MDMarra, sysadmin1138 Aug 14 '11 at 19:21

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Are you using NAT networking in VirtualBox, or bridged mode? –  Kamil Kisiel Dec 11 '09 at 5:25

2 Answers 2

I suspect that Kamil is right.

Change your networking in VirtualBox to Bridged instead of NAT, and I think this will work a lot better.

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Also note things like this in the VirtualBox 3.1.2 user manual, section 6.3.3 "NAT Limitations" on page 94:

Protocols such as GRE are unsupported: Protocols other than TCP and UDP are not supported. This means some VPN products (e.g., PPTP from Microsoft) can- not be used. There are other VPN products which use simply TCP and UDP.

In case it helps, one thing I've done in the past, is setup openvpn on the host. This way, all the guests using NAT have access to the vpn tunnel.

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That shouldn't matter in this case. OpenVPN is pure TCP or UDP, at least as far as the host/transport is concerned. –  Christopher Cashell Jul 9 '10 at 16:12

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