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In a public computer lab, we want to set something up so that when a user starts to use the machine they have to accept terms of use that will appear on the screen by clicking an Accept button. We would also like this screen to show some graphics if possible.

When they are done using the computer it should revert back to this screen after the computer has been idle for 5 minutes. There are 3-4 machines at 17 different locations that are not on the same network. Setting all these machines up one at a time is acceptable.

These are all Windows machines, I think they are mostly XP, some may be newer.

Can someone recommend a program or any other way to do this easily?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use these instructions to create a login warning screen, with text that the user accepts by clicking "Ok". The benefit to this approach is that it doesn't require third-party software, and you can script the registry changes into a .reg file than can easily be installed on the target machines. However, it can't display graphics.

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Actually, this is the commonly accepted way to present terms of use. My employer uses the same technique. The fact that the user needs to click "OK" is valid as proof of acceptance. You might also be able to display a special background image while on the logon page. Normally, this is just a blue background but I think it's possible to adjust this... –  Wim ten Brink Dec 11 '09 at 7:51
    
Yup, some of our clients do this as well. –  phoebus Dec 11 '09 at 8:04
    
Use Group Policy to set the "LegalNoticeCaption" and "LegalNoticeText" values (in Computer Settings, Windows Settings, Security Settings, Local Policies, Security Options) rather than hacking them into the registry by-hand. There's no default method to modify the "LogonPrompt" value, but it would trivial to write an administrative template to set it (albeit it would "tattoo" the registry). –  Evan Anderson Dec 11 '09 at 13:00
    
From the tone of the question, it sounded like these are not centrally-managed machines, but a few scattered standalones at various locations. Merging a .reg is likely easier and more expedient for these folks, but they can certainly used per-machine policies done locally if they want. –  phoebus Dec 11 '09 at 14:40

The easiest way to do it is through GPO. see my answer to This question on how to do it

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