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I have an active directory domain controller in the 10.1.x.x address space that hosts some files. These files are replicated using DFS-R to a second machine over a crossover cable on a dedicated interface in the 192.168.x.x address space.

The replication setup works great, but the domain controller keeps creating a DNS A record that points to the internal replication interface - when the clients out in the 10.1.x.x space query for the domain controller's SRV record, half the time it will answer with the 192.168.x.x address of the replication interface so clients can't contact the domain controller.

I've unchecked the "Register this connection's addresses in DNS" setting for the replication interface since that seemed like the obvious fix, but it still creates the problematic record. Right now, I run dnscmd via a scheduled task every few minutes to remove the record whenever it appears, but this is certainly an ugly hack. What am I missing?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're probably also using these DCs for DNS servers, too. The Microsoft DNS server registers A records for the IP addresses the DNS server is listening on (see this article which, tangentally, mentions this behaviour). This has been the behaviour of the DNS server since Windows 2000.

So, configure the DNS server not to listen on those private addresses (on the "Interfaces" tab of the properties of each DNS server) and you'll find that the records are no longer registered.

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that's what I'd bet my nickel on as well –  Jim B Dec 21 '09 at 5:27
    
I was researching something else last night and came across this very setting...seems to have taken care of it. Thanks for the help. –  JR. Dec 21 '09 at 20:29

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