Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Could someone point me to a HOWTO on setting up a rescue partition the way it is described here: http://serverfault.com/questions/62976/fsck-root-filesystem-on-a-remote-machine/63007#63007

I'm about to place a server in a data center and would love to have something like that setup "just-in-case".

Thanks!!! flatlinebb

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

it seems the post you are referencing tells you most of the solution. Just create an additional partition and install some type of linux distribution on it. When you are installing your desired linux distribution as your main system, change grub or lilo to have a reference to your rescue linux os.

When you experience any problems change your bootoader to boot your rescue partition. Mount your main filesystem in the rescue system and do whatever is needed. When finished change your bootloader back to your main system.

Another possibility is to get access to a remote administration card of the server. The main server producers ship their servers with remote administration cards. IBM calls it RSA, Dell calls it RAC (I think) and HP calls it ILO. With these cards you can remote connect to the console of the server. This way you could choose the booted system from the console or directly do things via remote console.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Christian. I am aware of the remote admin cards, but they are expensive. A rescue partition would be free. I was looking for a bit more in-depth guide. –  Flatlinebb Jan 29 '10 at 21:00
    
what information are you missing? this should be easier as giving a complete setup guide. –  Christian Jan 30 '10 at 9:20
    
Christian: how to create a rescue partition on a live system, how to install it, and then how to use it if something goes wrong. –  Flatlinebb Mar 30 '11 at 20:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.