3
votes
1answer
141 views

No space left on device - wrong size

I'm running an FreeBSD dedicated server. I am getting messages that I have ran out of space on the device. df -h is saying that I have no space left but du -sh /* doesn't even show the directiories ...
3
votes
3answers
5k views

How to recover free space on deleted files without restarting the referencing processes?

When big files are deleted on a server, the files might still be referenced by processes, so the file system doesn't have more free space. I tried to use lsof, but it seems it didn't list the deleted ...
0
votes
1answer
666 views

can I delete the files in the proc folder without consequence?

I see my proc folder getting bigger and bigger and I have limitation in terms of number of files. Can I delete those files or will it have consequences? thanks
0
votes
1answer
241 views

Disk size and space detection

i'm running a server with debian stable : Linux myhostname 2.6.32-5-xen-amd64 #1 SMP Tue Mar 8 00:01:30 UTC 2011 x86_64 GNU/Linux It is running a nginx, mail server,ftp server and a mysql database. ...
0
votes
4answers
249 views

Calculate disk space occupied by many .png files

I have 357 .png files located in different sub dirs of the current dir: settings# find . -name \*.png |wc -l 357 settings# find . -name \*.png | head ./assets/authenticationIcons/audio.png ...
2
votes
1answer
377 views

determining disk space usage on plesk domain

I have an unix webserver runing Plesk control panel with several domains configured. Plesk is reporting that one of the domains is using 1129 mb of disk space, however, I can't seem to find what ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

After deleting a large file, how long does it take `df` to pick up the change?

I deleted a 2.3GB log file on my Ubuntu server, and df doesn't seem to be picking up the change. Is there typically a delay before df can detect that a large file has been deleted?
0
votes
1answer
398 views

Weird output from df on Solaris 9

I just ran df -h on a Solaris 9 machine and got a a very weird output, something I have never seen before. /proc 0K 0K 0K 0% /proc mnttab 0K 0K ...