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You should be taking a systematic approach to determining where the bottleneck is. Take a look at those 80 requests in your web browser's development tools; Is the time-to-first-byte on the main content, or any specific resource, unreasonably high? You'll need to look at what is going on with that resource. If it's the main HTML page, then the slowness ...


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Use SetEnfIf: The internal environment variables set by this directive are set after most early request processing directives are run, such as access control and URI-to-filename mapping. If the environment variable you're setting is meant as input into this early phase of processing such as the RewriteRule directive, you should instead set the ...


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No. Why would you even want to? nginx is built for speed, this would just slow it down. You can do includes if you want to keep your config cleaner though. Something like this would work server { include includes/rewrites.conf; ... } Then just have a directory called includes and store the rewrites there.


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I've done it with the following (with a slight change to the directory structure): /app/ - index.html (for modern browsers) - .htaccess (with remapping for IE 6-8) /ie - index.html and other files - .htaccess (to turn off further remapping efforts) The contents of .htaccess in /app is: RewriteEngine on RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} "MSIE ...


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What you are trying to do is very difficult to get right. If you make a mistake in when you use http and when you use https, you could open up numerous security problems. My recommendation would be to configure one http vserver in apache, which redirects to the same https URL and does nothing else. It doesn't even have to figure out if the URL exists or ...



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