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19

There is no such thing as "admins per server". You can not apply "miles-per-gallon" metric here. It's possible to have 5 smart guys administering a well designed farm of 4,000 servers. It's also possible to have 5 dumbasses not knowing how to administer a single Windows server even though they had all the right acronyms on their resumes. UPDATE: I am ...


13

There's already plenty of information(Questions/Posts) in ServerFault for a beginner Linux administrator: Linux How-to/Tutorial sites Setting-up Linux at home Tools you should absolutely know as a Windows/Linux Admin Good Linux Podcasts/Links for beginners Hidden Features in Linux How to recruit a Linux Guru What a beginner should know about a SysAdmin Job ...


11

Web For pen testing web sites, try these Firefox extensions: (All are free.) Firebug LiveHTTPHeaders Tamper Data I've also heard good things about Fiddler (freeware, any browser, Windows only). General Networking Wireshark - protocol analysis; see what's on your network. Free, for any OS. Netcat - generic low-level client and server; the "TCP/IP ...


10

A collision domain is basically a network segment in which only one device can communicate at a time. This would apply to devices connected through a hub. | RTR | | | | | |switch1| |switch2| | ...


10

RHEL/CentOS uses SELinux quite extensively. Ubuntu has AppArmor as stated earlier. RHEL/CentOS has by default much less software available than Ubuntu; you may need to add repositories such as EPEL, depending what your server needs to run. RHEL uses more traditional way for booting and managing services, Ubuntu uses upstart. RHEL has more comprehensive ...


8

Check /etc/aliases, look for the line root: root@workdomain.com edit: as a test, try this echo "test" | mail root -s "this is a test" then check /var/log/maillog, and the headers when it is received on your admins machine


8

What you're attempting to do is not a simple thing, so looking for a simple solution is a snipe hunt. Your best bet would be to pick up the Zenoss VM image and use that. It's the closest non-commercial turn-key solution you'll get. Easy. Cheap. Good. Pick two.


7

Though there may be a technical solution to this, it's really more of a policy/HR issue. Inform that user's manager of the situation as well as the HR department. If they turn a blind eye to the situation, then there's not a whole lot left for you to do. In this situation, they're implicitly condoning his behavior and even if you disabled his ability to turn ...


7

OmniGraffle for Mac is great for just kind of thing, have you considered using VisioCafe's excellent make/model-specific stencils with Visio? - actually having representative graphics of the actual servers/switches etc. adds so much.


7

use groupadd admin to add the group then you could run adduser myuser admin. However you may want to instead use usermod -G myuser,admin myuser to remove yourself from the root group. (instead of myuser,admin, list the exact list of groups your user should be a member of. If you ever get tempted to edit /etc/group directly, please use the vigr command, ...


6

Kia ora. Your options are: Make the user local admin Employ some kind of packaging & deployment solution, like MSI installers and group policy - i.e. some agent service is running as admin Provide the password to the local Administrator account, and show the contractors how to switch user from their personal (domain?) accounts when installing software. ...


6

Think about scale, audit trail and backouts. In the real world you need to do stuff often and you often need to do it to lots of servers. So scripting and automation become important. The level of rigour tends to be higher than what you might use at home. So you need to think about how you can record your changes (the better to identify what change it was ...


6

The optimum formula is Competence - (Workload^(Stupid Management)) + Red Bull.


6

I build platforms and form support teams in a similar manner, plus you state you need 'very high availability (HA)', that's what I do too, so let's see how we get on :) You need to break your skillsets down into groups, also you're covering a lot of bases here and HA requires good or great skills rather adequate or intermediate skills. From what ...


5

Web curl - A library and utilities to make custom HTTP/FTP requests wget - A utility to quickly download URLs netcat - A simple yet powerful utility to open a connection to a remote server or listen on a local port Python's urllib2 module - Great for scripting mass downloads, testing URLs, grabbing data quickly to parse, etc Network nmap - Port ...


5

One I wrote to help a colleague, who RDPd to a server, opened Event Viewer, looked through it for errors. Then repeated for the other 3 servers... every day. ' ' WMI script to read all eventlog errors generated since last time this script was run. ' This script reads a datetime value from a file (EventView_date.txt) and uses it to ' construct a WMI query ...


5

Mine: Perl - To script when I don't have the right tool. NetStumbler - To detect wireless. WireShark - To sniff traffic. Cain & Abel - To crack passwords and exploit LSA Secrets. NMap - Port Scanner SysInternal PSTools Suite - Ton of useful tools Fiddler - IE Proxy that allows you to see HTTP Request / Response even with SSL Nessus - General ...


4

Beyond the basics, here are a few areas that you should probably investigate further: Settings up a mail system that performs well enough for hundreds of users, good spam filtering, security, backup solution, webmail access, etc... Learning and experimenting with backup: choosing a good strategy, implementing it, making it as effective in $$ as possible ...


4

I imagine that Dave is right and your issue is with /etc/aliases, but FWIW, you can set cron output to go to a specific address by putting a MAILTO line at the top. Run crontab -e and add something like MAILTO=jdoe@example.com as the first line. Note that this will go through the regular email system you have installed, which presumably includes any ...


4

Use virtualization. Give then their own system within a system. This way all development sandboxes are independent of each other, and cannot interfere with one another or with the Host OS.


4

Have you had a look at BackTrack Linux? I've written a little framework around it so I can easily drop in my own scripts and packages, that way I just burn a disc each time I need to go remote.


4

You can always invoke a cmd shell with administrator rights (or any other runas method), and use a tool such as SETX to modify the path permanently. Existing shells and/or running programs will probably be using the old path, but any new shell/program will use the new settings.


4

No plugins necessary, if you're comfortable with the command line. TracAdmin is your friend. List the name and email for the given sids (username): trac-admin /usr/local/share/trac/test session list SID Auth Last Visit Name Email ------------------------------------------------------------ bob 1 1970-01-01 Bob Smith ...


4

Developers should always develop as regular users of the machine for two (there's probably more) reasons: Developers are human. They try to go to untrusted sites. They accidentally delete things. If their day to day account does not have administrative rights, then they minimize their exposure. If they develop using the rights their end users should have, ...


4

I found an excellent hint in answer to a different question. Looking for processes in state 'D' shows four PHP processes that seem to hang for quite a while corresponding to the "steps" in the load curve: #> ps aux | awk '$8 ~ /D/ { print $0 }' wiki 6651 0.0 0.0 0 0 ? D Oct04 0:41 [php-cgi] bugs 6731 0.0 0.0 0 ...


4

No matter how much you may want at least an approximate answer to your question it's not possible to give one without knowing a lot about your infrastructure, users and usage. I'll give you an example. In my previous role I was responsible for the Australian network for a multi-national company. The number of servers had absolutely no effect on my workload ...


4

If you need 100% uptime with someone on call 24/7, I would suggest you need at least two full time sysadmins, working alternating shifts, and at least one part-timer, regardless of your network size. If you have just one sysadmin who's on call 24/7 then: S/he's going to hate their job, nomatter how much you pay S/he's wife/husband is going to hate the job ...



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