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31

Personal ones for my account, ~/bin. System-wide ones go in /usr/local/bin or /usr/local/sbin as appropriate (scripts which should only be run as root go in sbin, while scripts intended to help ordinary users go in bin), rolled out via configuration management to ensure that all machines that need them have them (and the latest versions, too).


26

Well some software is specifically written for AIX/Solaris etc. while some 'money men' don't trust 'free' software (I've witnessed this myself, someone told me I HAD to spend money on OS!). But most of the time it's to get 24/365 support.


18

Because then you have a big name behind it that you can talk to for providing a SLA.


8

Software maintenance in AIX is complicated and alien to the uninitiated. These days, major major AIX OS updates are referred to as a "maintenance level" (ML) and revisions to those code drops are referred to as "service packs" (SP). You'll want to determine what level you systems are currently at and the level you wish to upgrade to prior to starting the ...


8

Because you don't want to get locked into an open system. -- Unknown IBM executive, 1991


8

It sounds like this filename may contain a non-printable character. That would explain "touch" making a different file. Try something like ls -b in the directory to see if that's the case? Then you should be able to do something like: rm -i S*2 and it should prompt you for the file even with the hidden character. Alternately, you ...


7

For more complex stuff, especially something that could be shared between multiple machines I tend to make distribution packages, Debian in my case. I use /usr/bin, and give scripts some common prefix. That way it's easier to deploy and keep track of them. For my personal stuff, ~/bin is good enough.


7

man pwdadm pwdadm -c


7

Why don't you try this. Start scp'ing a large file then run lsof /path/to/file on the AIX server and see what the FD column says. From the lsof man page: FD is the File Descriptor number of the file or: cwd current working directory; Lnn library references (AIX); err FD information ...


7

Adding to previous answers: It depends on what you are going to run on the server. Example: If you want to run Oracle, you go with (both hardware and) operating systems that Oracle itself says its (particular version of the) software is tested (certified by them) to run on.


7

[ needs a space after it because [ is actually a command (/usr/bin/[ on Linux, though bash has a built-in version that it uses). Without the space, bash converts $x to the value, then tries to run the command [0, just as if you had typed lssomedir or echohi. Also, if you are testing strings, you should put quotes around $x: if [ "$x" == "string" ] ...


6

rootvg is, as the name suggests, the volume group (vg) that contains / (root) and any other logical volumes you created during installation -- it's basically the default AIX volume group. Volume Groups (VGs) are an AIX thing -- they're basically logical disks (comprised of one or more Physical Volumes (PVs). Logical Volumes (LVs -- "partitions") are ...


5

According to the Rosetta Stone for Unix, the command you want is "dump -H".


5

find . -type f \( -perm -u=x -o -perm -g=x -o -perm -o=x \) worked for me. any other solutions?


5

You are correct in the fact that oslevel will give you the current installed version, but that is not always enough information particularily if you are asked the question by support personnel. # oslevel <--- this will only give you the Base Level To be more precise you should use the following command which will give you additional Technology ...


5

lslpp -w <file> looks right, according to the unix rosetta stone: http://bhami.com/rosetta.html#software


5

Corporate and government sector clients feel safer this way. They are used to paying for software and when something is offered for free they would think it is of lower quality. Technical support. When you pay for RHEL for example you are paying for technical support and updates. Hardware vendors sometimes lock you in the situation. For example IBM has a ...


5

On server1 -- SOURCE=a.txt DEST=a.txt R_HOST=server2 scp $SOURCE $R_HOST:$DEST || mutt -s "[copy failed] Copy of $SOURCE failed" admin@company.com Requires you have mutt installed. If you don't, get mutt, or replace the mutt portion with a sendmail alternative.


5

[Pushing up from comments] Two options: Batch mode from text-based browsers such as links/lynx/w3m Use openssl s_client as noted here: Connecting to HTTPS with netcat (nc)


5

Bash provides the -nt comparison operator which returns true if one file is newer than another file. Here's a script which illustrates this functionality #!/bin/bash if [[ "$1" -nt "$2" ]] then echo "$1 is newer than $2 - copying $1" #do something else if [[ "$2" -nt "$1" ]] then echo "$2 is newer than $1 - copying $2" ...


5

I can do it using just touch, test, and date. (tested on AIX 5.3.0.0) First you need to create a file 30 minutes in the past (Unfortunately, this requires prior knowledge of the current timezone on the machine. But you may be able to work that into things if need be.) In this example, the current timezone is EST5EDT (GMT-4). If you're lucky, the machine ...


4

At the user's shell prompt: source ~/.profile Or . ~/.profile


4

use clamav as a file scanner? aix packages: http://www.clamav.net/lang/en/download/packages/packages-other/


4

I recommend grabbing O'Reilly's Sendmail book (Bat on front).


4

Terminate the applications that are holding the files open.


4

It sounds like you don't want hosting, you want a build and test environment. If this is just for development, find out how to become an IBM VAR or partner or licensed developer or whatever the hell they call the appropriate program, and then you should be able to get access to their labs. Every big UNIX vendor has something like that. If you're in the ...


4

Flush the netcd DNS cache: netcdctrl -t dns -e hosts -f Hostname lookup order is determined using /etc/irs.conf, /etc/netsvc.conf and then $NSORDER. Keep in mind though, that irs.conf and $NSORDER are typically not used.


4

You may want to look at the Rosetta Stone for UNIX guide. Select "AIX" and "Linux" in the upper-left corner, then click "Draw Table". This will show you some command equivalents to help get you started. Also see: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/10408/how-to-run-a-fresh-version-of-aix-in-a-virtual-machine-with-a-linux-host


4

Your perl script apparently uses bytecode. Bytecode is kind of like compiled code. It is pre-parsed code which loads more efficiently than normal script code (really bad explanation, wikipedia probably does a better job). However in perl, running the bytecode is restricted to the version of the module it was built with. So what this means is that you used ...



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