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1

I answered this same question on Stack Overflow. s3fs is indeed a reasonable solution, and in my case, I've coupled it with proftpd with excellent results, in spite of the theoretical/potential problems. At the time I wrote the answer, I had only set this up for one of my consulting clients... but since then, I've also started drinking my own kool-aid and ...


5

The first problem isn't on your instance at all... it's your terminal, which isn't correctly configured for utf-8, so you're seeing characters other than what's supposed to be displayed. Googling ââ linux will find many examples of this, such as https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=517447 The second problem is that you are confusing volumes (disks) ...


1

EBS volumes cost per-GB, per-month regardless of their usability. So yes, you are still being charged for that volume. As it is brand new, you may want to detach it, blow it away, create another one, and reassociate it. If that shows a garbled name as well, see if a reboot causes the name to become less weird.


1

The mongo documentation on EC2 recommends using EBS over instance store: EC2 instances can be configured either with ephemeral storage or persistent storage using the Elastic Block Store (EBS). Ephemeral storage is lost when instances are terminated so it is generally not recommended for use unless you’re comfortable with the data-loss ...


0

Depending on your setup. But from what you have written it is the option with 'everything under /mnt/my-data' is in EBS, the rest is in ephemeral storage. You might either change the mountpoint of EBS to contain your mongo database, or make a symlink (though I am not 100% sure mongo won't complain).


0

You can check this in cloudwatch Check for EBS Metrics and choose VolumeWriteOps (Metric Name) take any sample from the graph for e.g. Data-point : 152398 at 2011-02-10T07:54+0000 (Any highest count from the graph) so it means 152398 IOPS for 10 mins intervel calculate this for 1 min 152398 IOPS / 10 minutes = 15239.8 IOPS/minute then calculate ...


0

Here's an alternate approach; Attach and mount the old EBS volume on a running EC2 instance. If you are wanting to copy a boot volume, it's best to do it on a different instance, with the old volume mounted as data, not with the volume being used as a live system. Create a new EBS volume of the desired size. Attach the new volume to the instance and ...


1

So this is a little old, but I just solved a similar problem, myself (Using /mnt/tmp as the system temp dir) and had to figure out why MySQL wouldn't start up. You're probably running up against the AppArmor settings that prevent MySQL from using directories on the /mnt drive. You'll need to add your new tmp path to the MySQL app armor list of allowed ...



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