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4

If it's genuinely a new instance, you likely have an autoscaling group and launch configuration set up. Check those sections of the console. If it's the same instance ID, your termination command is failing for some reason. If no error is being shown in the console, contact AWS Support.


4

Did you run out of physical memory or did you run out of backing store? If the latter, swap would have let your system continue to operate normally even without any data being written to it! "[I]s there a reason I might not want to enable swap if I don't need it for normal operation?" Yes. Having swap available is necessary for the OS to make efficient use ...


4

This is by design. You will need to re-associate the EIP when starting your instance.


3

You can provision Elastic IPs and assign them to instances. These IPs remain yours to use until you release them back into Amazon's pool of addresses. Do note that provisioning an EIP without using it costs you a small amount of money per hour. If you only have a handful of instances, don't go provisioning 13 EIPs and leaving most of them inactive.


3

Often security groups for newly-created instances are configured to only allow traffic from a single IP. You may need to log into the AWS console (https://console.aws.amazon.com/console/home) and edit the EC2 security group for that instance to explicitly allow access on either SSH (Linux) or RDP (Windows) ports from your new IP address (or subnet) in ...


3

Amazon announced ClassicLink literally just yesterday. I haven't had time to try it out yet so I'm not sure exactly what it's capable of but from that blog post: You can now enable this feature for any or all of your VPCs and then put your existing Classic instances in to VPC security groups. It sounds like this feature might be ideally suited to ...


2

Possibly an IP address of your EC2 instance has changed, since you have restarted it. Check in Amazon EC2 console for new IP address.


2

The are several ways to do what you want, one of them, assuming your local machine is a Windows one, would be: Acces via putty onto the ubuntu machine use tar to archive and compress the directory, for example using bzip2 tar cjvf /path/to/target/archive.tar.bz2 /path/to/directory/to/compress use psftp, access to the ubuntu machine and download the tar ...


2

You tagged this amazon-vpc, but the behavior you describe is what happens when an instance is launched in EC2-Classic. When you launch an instance in a VPC, it is assigned a private IP address and it remains for the lifetime of the instance. Their documentation is pretty clear on that point. To be clear, 'instance' in this case is a discrete 'i-' number. ...


2

Ubuntu 13.04 is no longer supported, the repo mirrors have dropped the packages - thus the 404 errors you're seeing. Switch to the old-releases.ubuntu.com mirror and upgrade to a supported version, as is detailed in the documentation here.


2

I use tun for this exact use-case in our VPC (we use linux rather than windows, but that aside its the same). So I'd say tun is acceptable in this case. Things to look for are: Is the OpenVPN server within the VPC passing traffic? Most Linux distributions do not by default forward IP traffic. This should be easy to test by running a sniffer on the ...


2

as alternative to touch /forcefsck, one can attach dirty volume to another instance, run fsck on that dirty volume and reattach it back to original instance.


2

If you've done all the steps correctly, make sure you're in the correct region as AMI's are region specific.


1

When it comes to pre-warming your load balancer, AWS does not come with any built-in feature for that. They suggest that you do your own "load test" script that increase traffic incrementally OR to contact them and they will have it pre-warmed for you. When you add another availability zone that your load balancer should include, I believe that the whole ...


1

Not 100% what you are after but you should look at Ice. https://github.com/Netflix/ice


1

Do you have your RDS instance in a VPC? Are you sure that your RDS instance has the "Publicly Accessible" setting set to "Yes"? If you want to be able to access your RDS instance from outside your VPC, you need to switch that option to "Yes".


1

Actually, I don't think there is a compiled list of services that allow paths in ARNs for a service's resources. And I'm not really sure why you would need this, however, by going through example ARNs for all services you could probably figure it out all by yourself! :)


1

You can specify the version of chef client to install through the the --bootstrap-version option of knife ec2 server create. It is your workstation that specifies, which version to install during bootstrap. The version running on your chef server does not matter.


1

you can do this, and make whatever other server changes in general (ie sign into puppet), with cloud-init and passing --user-data at launch. http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/user-data.html


1

The behavior you are describing is probably because you are connecting from different networks and/or your network does not have a static public IP. Basically, your IP has changed and you therefor need to edit the security group with your new IP. I would suggest some reading about AWS EC2 security groups and dynamic vs. static IPs. ...


1

An instance can terminate itself and also access its own tags. Therefore you just need to figure out how to run that from within the instance after a certain period of time if the instance has a particular tag. You could either use a cron job, or perhaps something like monit to execute the termination if it detects your CI process isn't running for more ...


1

I think the key is that you need to know what memory your process is going to need. If you're using EC2 that means you've picked an instance size that will cover some workload; often I've seen that workload is only one process/service. Adding a bunch of swap is cheap but you need to know when/why it's using that swap. Too often I see answers here that say; ...


1

@flurdy's answer is good as a one-off resolution. But if you often: launch new EC2 instances, start and stop EC2 instances, ..without using Elastic IPs (permanently attached to your servers) then you deal with new/changing IPs/hostnames of your instances all the time. If so then you may want to permanently stop SSH checking and storing server ...


1

If Your instance is very important to you then you may check that by following: Work on Corrupted Ubuntu Instance / Disk or Work on Another Instance Used for Recovery Purpose You can mount your RootDisk (1) to another instance (2).. Then Enable its lost root access by changing in /etc/ssh/sshd_config (1) file of this disk.. or assign sudoer to another ...


1

You're missing a few requirements in order for sox to be usable, mainly libmad. This is what I use to install sox in an EC2: [NOTES] In FAAC you need to delete a line making a deprecated call or it won't compile. LIBMAD needs a patch in order to compile. I run ldconfig after each build, it may be overkill but a couple of times I didn't do it the install ...


1

Check what is the DNS server that is configured in /etc/resolv.conf file. This could be your old bind9 server. If your nodes are using DHCP then you might need to configure this in your DHCP server. Regarding the short cut usage of dev for dev.mydomain.local you need to add search directive to resolv.conf search mydomain.local Once the search directive ...


1

I havent worked with much AWS, but the general way of doing it will be as follows. Let say currently you have example.com hosted in Route53, so Route53 is the authoritative nameserver for your example.com zone. Now if you want a subdomain called client.example.com which again needs to point to the same IP address where example.com. So in that case create ...



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