Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

AWS EC2 shows the SSH2 fingerprint, not the OpenSSH fingerprint everyone expects. It doesn't say this in the UI. It also shows two completely different kinds of fingerprints depending on whether the key was generated on AWS and downloaded, or whether you uploaded your own public key. Fingerprints generated with ssh-keygen -l -f id_rsa will not match ...


16

Most Linuxes these days should perform a forced fsck at boot time when the file /forcefsck is present on the system. If you are at liberty to reboot the VM, run touch /forcefsck Then reboot at your convenience


8

So, for a full answer, basically your SSD drives are ephemeral disks, and according to the AWS documentation the only way to use these ephemeral disk is to create a new instance. (The feature to attach ephemeral storage to the instance after it has been create it's not available yet) This is from the AWS docs: Instances that use Amazon EBS for the root ...


8

How would this be setup connection wise without forcing all traffic through the domain controller? With site to site VPNs. You'd set up your cloud assets as a site, and then establish a site-to-site VPN between your cloud site and each of your physical sites. An alternate option, that Microsoft uses, but is generally ill-advised (unless you really, ...


7

From the AWS Developer Forum post on this topic: Try stopping the broken instance, detaching the EBS volume, and attaching it as a secondary volume to another instance. Once you've mounted the broken volume somewhere on the other instance, check the /etc/sshd_config file (near the bottom). I had a few RHEL instances where Yum scrogged the ...


7

You have an incompatible repository "rpmforge". This only works on RHEL and clones, and isn't compatible with Amazon Linux (which used to be a RHEL clone, but isn't anymore). You have a couple of options: Remove the rpmforge repository and try again. Note that you might not be able to do this if you actually need packages from this repository. The ...


7

The EC2 monitoring documentation suggests a method of doing this by installing the Monitoring Scripts for Amazon EC2 Instances and then configuring a cron job to gather the data and reprt back.


7

VPC does not make any difference in latency. The main thing you can consider if you need especially low latency is using placement groups. There are some limitations on which instance sizes support this, but if you use them, you are guaranteed very low-latency interconnects on the EC2 10Gbps network.


7

This is clearly a bug in the software computing the traffic rate. You need to show the image to the vendor of the software, which produced the graph. That's the only way, you are going to get an answer as to what happened. Probably some negative number showed up where a positive number was expected, and wrapped around to around 18EB. Use that erroneous ...


6

Try the following link. Add a config file in your root inside .ebextensions directory. Then add this. files: "/etc/httpd/conf.d/vhost.conf": mode: "000644" owner: root group: root encoding: plain content: | NameVirtualHost *:80 <VirtualHost *:80> DocumentRoot "/var/app/current/" <Directory ...


6

If your VPC EC2 instances are in private subnets, then to access EC2-Classic, your VPC will need a NAT. Give your NAT an elastic IP address so it's a constant public IP address. Then in your RDS security group, allow access only for that Elastic IP address. If your VPC EC2 instances are in public subnets, then you could give each of them elastic IP ...


6

No, t1.micro uses PV instances. Use t2.micro for an HVM instance.


6

Using a VPC will solve a lot of your problems, as private IP addresses will be static there. Amazon is strongly encouraging people to move to VPC for reasons like this. Once you have one, your two systems should be able to talk over the AWS-internal network. To answer your question about exposure along the aws-public <---> aws-public route, it is ...


6

You want to setup NTP. See: http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/set-time.html Extra content here.


5

TLDR: ec2-register -a x86_64 -d '3.15.7-200.fc20.x86_64' -n 'Fedora_20_HVM_AMI' --sriov simple --virtualization-type hvm -s snap-b44feb18 --root-device-name /dev/sda1 Detailed steps: Answering further based upon Jeff Strunk's response to simplify the steps and giving a bit more details on the ec2 register image: Create Instance using PV Image. Make / ...


5

DNS. It is a CNAME to be exact. Stupid 30 character requirement


5

Bitlocker is solid technology. It's FIPS 140-2 compliant and there have not been any sort of backdoors discovered in it (to the consternation of certain law-enforcement agencies, who want backdoors into your data.) I highly recommend it. But is it hack-proof? Nah, of course not. Nothing is hack proof. In the "transparent operation mode" like you're ...


5

There are a couple approaches to consider for how to terminate an instance from itself: Start the EC2 instance with the instance-initiated-shutdown-behavior set to "terminate", then "sudo halt" or equivalent from inside the instance. Start the EC2 instance with an IAM role that allows it to terminate itself, then invoke the ec2 terminate-instances API from ...


5

If you are trying to mange crontabs programmatically, just create a file in /etc/cron.d/ for example, /etc/cron.d/example-cron, and populate it with the aforementioned lines: @daily ubuntu /home/ubuntu/db-backup-to-s3-daily.sh @hourly ubuntu /home/ubuntu/db-backup-to-s3-hourly.sh The only difference is that you have to include a user to run the cron as, ...


5

Provide your script via "user-data" during your launch process and it will be executed upon first boot. If you're using awscli, use the --user-data option" $ aws ec2 run-instances --image-id ami-xxxxxxxx --count 1 --instance-type m1.small --key-name foo-key --security-group-ids sg-xxxxxxxx --subnet-id subnet-xxxxxxxx --placement AvailabilityZone=us-west-2a ...


5

Since you cannot boot into live disc, this is may sounds a bit weird, but i guess it'll do the job) high level: boot into new (another) instance. attach storage from old instance to new (current). run fsck. detach storage from new (current) and reattach it to old instance.


5

This is due to a limitation of RPM/YUM on Amazon Linux, and the way that the multiple versions of php are packaged. One of the features of Amazon Linux is that there are multiple versions of several languages and other opensource software packages. In many cases these packages have to conflict with one another, as the software is not designed to be installed ...


4

sudo pip install --upgrade awscli


4

Came across the same issue with Server version: Apache/2.4.6 As per the documentation at [1], "In 2.4.5 and later, SSLProxyCheckPeerCN has been superseded by SSLProxyCheckPeerName, and its setting is only taken into account when SSLProxyCheckPeerName off is specified at the same time." So adding following entry did the trick.. SSLProxyCheckPeerName off ...


4

You have to re-launch the instance. During launch in step 4 (adding storage), add an "Instance Store 0" to your instance. This will allocate the SSD for you. Note that this temporary storage and is lost if you terminate the instance!


4

You need to hit stop a few times until forcibly stop becomes available. If it is still not stopped use the Amazon EC2 API, and do a force stop.


4

You can easily get by with a m1.small for a normal size network, I think your network size should be fine with 2 m1.small instances. DO NOT use a micro instance. Especially if you're also running DNS on the same machine. The micro instances are very different in the way they handle resources and if use them you can expect to have periods of time where your ...


4

Found that new AWS type of instances have MTU 9001 by default and this causes erros with SSL packets: sometimes they are delayed and sometimes dropped. Setting MTU to 1500 helped to solve this issue. quotation from http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/instance-types.html: The maximum transmission unit (MTU) for an instance depends on its ...


4

The short answer is: You can create an A or CNAME record to the external IP address or the DNS name of your instance, but you don't want to do this. The long answer: You actually can create a CNAME (or even A) record without an Elastic IP. But every time your EC2 instance is rebooted and so moved to another host system the IP address (and your external ...


4

I'm not positive I understand your question completely, but if what you want is to be able to generate a list of your volumes, along with name tags, something like this might work: aws ec2 describe-tags --query "Tags[*].{Name:Value,ResourceId:ResourceId}" --filters "Name=key,Values=Name" --filters "Name=resource-type,Values=volume" --output json ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible