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0

Alright, so I figured it out. MemFree from /proc/meminfo measures the amount of unused memory on the system, without distinguishing by type. This is exactly the same thing that the watchdog daemon looks at when min-memory is set in watchdog.conf. When writing to a file, the OS page cache holds the data I'm writing in case it needs to be used again. Memory in ...


0

I was having this same problem and it turned out to be that nothing was broadcasting to the jgroups stack. Adding something like this fixed it for me: <subsystem xmlns="urn:jboss:domain:messaging:2.0"> <hornetq-server> <broadcast-groups> <broadcast-group name="bg-group1"> ...


-2

If not using ElasticCache you have to set that to False as well. So uncomment elasticache = False


0

A raw disk image with no headers and no dynamic allocation of space is supported natively by Linux. Creating it is quite simple: head -c1M /dev/zero >disk-image-file mkfs.ext4 disk-image-file mount -o loop disk-image-file /path/to/mount/point Caveats: A file created this way will be as large as the virtual drive regardless of how much space is actually ...


1

For EC2 instances, one trick is to add a comment to the user data script containing a version number, date, or similar, then change that whenever you want the instance recreated: { "Resources" : { "MyEC2Instance" : { "Type" : "AWS::EC2::Instance", "Properties" : { // ... other properties ... ...


0

There is usually a one-to-one correspondence between ec2 API functions and the permissions. So most of what you have in your policy is fine. You need to add the iam:PassRole permission. This is because your spot request is probably supplying an IAM role for your new EC2 Instances to run with. The iam:PassRole permission is needed because your lambda role ...


0

Instead of whitelisting S3 traffic at the NAT instance, I suggest you configure VPC endpoints for S3: New – VPC Endpoint for Amazon S3 (AWS Blog) AWS VPC User Guide: VPC Endpoints That way, your EC2 nodes can access S3 directly on the VPC private network instead of going through the NAT. If you still want a list of IPs used by S3, you can use the AWS ...


0

Move it via S3. It's almost 2 years later, and EC2 network performance in and out is still not great. It is actually faster to move via S3 even though this is an extra hop. I am in Sydney.


0

You can do this from inside of the AWS web interface. Navigate to snapshots, click the desired snapshot you wish to convert to hvm and click on actions and then create image. In the dropdown in the create image wizard select HVM.


0

You don't need a load-balancer. You need to adjust how your application deals with items in the queue. Benchmark your application on various instance sizes to determine the optimal/maximum number of tasks it can handle simultaneously. For the purpose of illustration, let's say that number is 20. Change your application to pull a maximum of 20 items from ...


0

An Elastic IP address, is an address that you request from AWS and is allocated to you until you choose to release it back to AWS. This means that only you can use this IP address. The benefits of an Elastic IP address over an auto-assigned Public IP address are: It's constant, meaning it won't change. It's movable, meaning you can move it from instance ...


0

EIPs are portable between EC2 instances. The auto-assigned IPs are not. Due to obvious reasons, you should use an EIP for any system that needs to be reachable by other systems.


0

The key insight here is that your md device is getting renamed on reboot. It was created as /dev/md0 but after a reboot it showed up as /dev/md127 (this was previously mentioned in a comment I'm bubbling it up as an answer for easier reading.) I just ran into exactly the same thing (created md0, rebooted, showed up as md127). Rebooted again, /dev/md127 ...


0

You can not update this setting at runtime, you need to add it to your my.cnf and restart your server. But also as @erny said, there are some issues that can come up if you are setting the value higher than the OS settings.


0

You can issue the AWS API commands from every machine (even outside of EC2) if you have the IAM credentials to do so. So to answer your question: Yes you can have one single backup server and yes this works for every EBS volume regardless of the file system or mount point. For the / mount point I should point out that you should make sure you have a clean ...


3

You don't want to try to connect the tunneled connection to port 3306 of the EC2 instance's public IP address, and that appears to be what you are doing. In EC2, machines have private IP addresses bound to their IP stack, and the AWS network hardware does 1:1 NAT to attach the public IP. It won't NAT you to yourself, hence the timeout. Use -L ...


0

Please check for public media snapshot available for SQL Server : Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 with SQL Server Express - ami-0b887d60 Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 with SQL Server Express and IIS - ami-77d0251c these are the two ami's with sql express


0

Check your EC2 security group if it has port 3306 open for at least your IP. If it doesn't add it and try again. Click on the instance and on Description you will see "Security groups" click on the Security Group name and then Inbound > Edit and there you should have the option to open the ports.


0

I had the same issue on Windows. When I added JAVA_HOME as C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.8.0_51 it worked for me


0

You have a process that binds to port 80 already. Check it out via netstat -ntp | find "80" Once you get its PID (1234 for instance) send a signal to gracefully shutdown the process: kill -15 1234 If it doesn't help and process is still running wait a bit then send another signal type to PID: kill -9 1234 After this you can start Nginx again with no ...


0

Make sure you have your AWS security groups are setup to allow access at 0.0.0.0/0 port 8888 using a custom TCP rule. verify your local network firewall allows outbound connections to port 8888.


0

The problem with implementing a generic backup schedule from the AWS Console is that Amazon doesn't know anything about what's on your volumes. That's why there are solutions like ec2-consistent-snapshot that can take care of things like freezing the filesystem and flushing & locking databases prior to taking the snapshot. Taking these extra steps help ...


2

After many hours of searching I found the answer here: http://www.syslog.org/forum/syslog-ng/tls-configuration-syntax-problem/ It's a limitation of the syslog-ng package in RHEL/EPEL: syslog-ng is in /sbin while openssl libraries are installed under /usr/lib. As /usr can be a separate partition unavailable during early boot, crypto support can't be ...


0

You have two options: 1 - Reprovision As EEAA mentioned, you can bring a new instance up, either configure it using a configuration management tool (if the server is used in production, you should be using configuration) or restore a backup, and then migrate your services and re-point DNS. This approach is very simple if you use configuration management ...


0

Unfortunately there is no feature available in the management console to create daily / hourly EBS snapshots. The only options are the ones you have highlighted although some people have created command line scripts which can do what you require and are relatively straight forward to configure for your own requirements. ...


1

S3 mainly offers exceptionally high durability and very low administration overhead. The service itself is not really that cheap (especially when it comes to serving requests), but at most scales the labour cost of managing alternatives blow any savings out of the water. However, at very large scales the savings start to outweigh the management overhead. ...


0

Since your root drive is EBS not ephemeral you are in good place to be. What is the difference and why EBS is better? Amazon EC2 instance with ephemeral drive is stateless, you can reboot but you can't stop. Reboot or terminate are only options that available. Amazon EC2 instance with EBS is statefull so Stop state is supported. Followed by subsequent ...


0

After working on this all night, I found a solutions that works. Here's a solutions that DOESN'T WORK: /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg: file.comment: - regex: ^ - set_hostname /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg: file.comment: - regex: ^ - update_hostname The reason that doesn't work is that the /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg bit is used as the ID for the state, and no two IDs ...


0

Kind of hackish, but you can chain the regex with an or: /etc/cloud/cloud.cfg: file.comment: - regex: ^ - set_hostname|^ - update_hostname


1

Figured this issue out: The issue was the Availability zones in the ELB. I thought I had to have an availability zone set the same as where my instance actually is and then at least one Public zone (the zone the instance is in is private). Apparently where the instance is doesn't matter, just the availability zones needs to be all public. Creating a ...


0

Assuming your instance is running in a VPC you can create an Elastic Network Interfaces (ENI) that has a public IP assigned to it then associate that ENI with your instance without needs to create a new one.


3

I'd suggest a cron job to publish the current queue length as a CloudWatch custom metric, which will allow you to create auto-scaling alarms based on its value.


0

Connection refused means that your gunicorn software isn't listening to the 8001 port you have configured in your nginx. You have to check your gunicorn configuration.


0

Using ssh-keygen to export the key in the .pem format worked for me. ssh-keygen -f id_rsa.pub -m 'PEM' -e > id_rsa.pem Then simply copy the .pem key as necessary. For reference the -f id_rsa.pub portion indicates the input file to read from, -m 'PEM indicates a PEM filetype and the -e option indicates that the output will be exported.


1

id_rsa is the file that you have to use to decrypt the Windows EC2 instance password, but just make sure that the file you copy paste is not phrase protected. I solved the problem getting a temporally unprotected id_rsa file with something like: openssl rsa -in ~/.ssh/id_rsa -out tmp_file.pem


-1

When you launch an EC2 instance, you assign to it a key pair (or none). It cannot be changed afterwards. Only using that .pem file from that key pair will you be able to decrypt the Windows password. The .pem file would have been downloaded when the key pair was created. You cannot get it again. If you have lost it, you're out of luck. You cannot use a ...


1

According to this, this command can be used: ssh-keygen -f id_rsa -e -m pem This will convert your public key to an OpenSSL compatible format. Double check if AWS isn't asking for a (X.509) certificate in PEM format, which would be a different thing than your SSH keys.


0

In recent versions of RVM, you can pass in the --binary option rvm install ruby-2.2.1 --binary --max-time 20 You can find a full list of available binaries with rvm list remote rvm list remote # Remote rubies available: jruby-0.9.0 jruby-1.6.5 jruby-1.7.8 jruby-1.7.9 jruby-9.0.0.0.pre1 jruby-9.0.0.0.pre2 jruby-9.0.0.0.pre2200 ...


0

An EC2 key pair private key file (*.pem) can only be downloaded when the key pair is created. If you have lost it, you cannot recover it. EC2 Key pairs can only be assigned to an EC2 instance when the EC2 instance is created. It cannot be changed or assigned-to later on. It is very important to preserve and protect your key pairs to prevent problems like ...


0

Kernel ID and Ramdisk ID properties are only applicable to Linux AMI images. They're simply not used for Windows AMI images. But, it is not possible to create a functional AMI image from a Windows-based EBS snapshot. This process only works for Linux AMI images. To create a Windows AMI image, you must create the image directly from the EC2 instance using ...


1

SSH keys can only be downloaded at the moment of creation. You can create an image from your instance and redeploy it with a new SSH keypair.


0

For the size of the cluster being used it may be a good idea to consider moving to a parallel file system like gluster. Alternately if the cluster is configured correctly every node should be aware of every other node either via DNS or by lookups to /etc/hosts and should have appropriate ssh keys to access them without a password. If this is the case ...


0

Got it working by directing the health check to port 22.


0

You're missing a library. Did you check all the dependencies? gconf2 is what you're looking for. I don't have an EC2 instance handy to see which package specifically you need, but it's definitely gconf2.


0

The Samba project basically provides the Linux server and client software for exposing or consuming Windows shares. The equivalent tool you are looking for here then is the sbmclient. Some simple examples here: /usr/bin/smbclient \\<ip address>\public mypasswd The smbmount command, also described in the link earlier shows you how you can mount the ...


0

If rebooting the system is not an issue you could try to reboot into single user mode, this answer explains how to do it using GRUB2 as the boot loader. If you have another system and the root filesystem of the broken instance is available/mountable you could try to mount it from the working system then use chroot /path/to/root/fs Once you have done ...


-2

Your best option may be to use an RDS instance db, increasing space using RDS is extremely easy.


2

An EC2 instance can have non-root volumes added and removed as necessary up to the number of volumes available for that instance type. Thusly, the maximum space available to an EC2 instance is the max size of an EBS volume times the number of volumes your instance can have. The pain here is going to be operational. When you add a new volume, do you ...


0

I'm reticent to approach this question without knowing the actual error you are seeing. The system is definitely booting according to the system log output you've provided. That means it's either a routing issue or transport issue. Please update this with the connection informatin/command/tool you are using and the error you are getting back. Since you ...


0

From the description you are providing, this instance may be part of an Auto Scaling Group either directly or through Elastic Beanstalk. If it is in an Auto Scaling Group, your Launch Configuration needs to be updated.



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