Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

setup a local nameserver (eg dnsmasq) and insert the CNAME records you need into that. dnsmasq.conf: cname=alias,horrible-long-hostname.example.com resolv.conf: nameserver 127.0.0.1


1

If all you are trying to do is simplify ssh'ing to that system, you can use an ssh config file. Create and edit ~/.ssh/config to contain: Host db: Hostname my-db.ooxxooxxooxxoo.ap-northeast-1.rds.amazonaws.com After that, a simple "ssh db" will lookup what's specified in your .ssh/config file and connect you.


1

Do you have your RDS instance in a VPC? Are you sure that your RDS instance has the "Publicly Accessible" setting set to "Yes"? If you want to be able to access your RDS instance from outside your VPC, you need to switch that option to "Yes".


2

RDS instances are managed by Amazon. As such, to prevent you from breaking things like replication, your users - even the root user you set up when you create the instance - will not have full superuser privileges. http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonRDS/latest/UserGuide/Appendix.PostgreSQL.CommonDBATasks.html When you create a DB instance, the master user ...


3

No, this is not possible. If you require this extension, you will need to run your own MySQL instances.


1

The issue was that the inbound rule in the Security Group specified a security group as the source. Changing it to a CIDR that included my IP address fixed the issue.



Top 50 recent answers are included