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1

I've been waiting for this too. Looks like it was added a couple of weeks after your post, you can find more information in this article "DNS": { "Type": "AWS::Route53::HostedZone", "Properties": { "HostedZoneConfig": { "Comment": "My hosted zone for example.com" }, "Name": "example.com", "VPCs": [{ "VPCId": "vpc-abcd1234", ...


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I don't believe that the above scenario is possible within route53. This page lists several complex usage patterns but your scenario doesn't fit in the functionality: http://docs.aws.amazon.com/Route53/latest/DeveloperGuide/dns-failover-complex-configs.html The closest I think you could get is to have your primary/secondary setup, with the secondary ...


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Go to your network administrator and ask him to add the name "test.admin.mysite.com" and resolve it to your ip on which the application is running. this is similar to adding an entry in your host file. But adding in the DNS home routs the requests in the network level for any computer that is trying to access this url from your internal network.


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This sounds like expected behavior. Exactly what happens when the HTTP server receives a request that it does not know how to deal with can differ, but no redirect is expected unless it happens at the HTTP level. A CNAME record is merely stating that a given name in DNS is an alias of a different name in DNS. What happens when you have a CNAME record in ...


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You are asking for the NS record of www.timeandbill.de. That is not the same as the NS record of timeandbill.de. That is a specific record type you are asking for, which returns no answer as you don't have those configured. You should query for an A or AAAA record. So unless you want the subzone www.timeandbill.de delegated to different DNS servers ...


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Here is a simple process to get from registering a new domain to having browser requests arrive at the web server. Yes it could be made more fancy, but the focus is on simple in order to clear away the common confusion about different roles of the registrar and Route 53. At your domain host (registrar), register your domain. Eg mydomain.com. If they ask ...


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I was wondering if AWS Route 53 offers the creation and removal of sub-domains using an API call that I can generate from my backend. You can definitely use the Route 53 API to create sub-domains, but you don't actually need to. (e.g. USERNAME.mywebapp.com) To support this you only need a *.mywebapp.com wildcard DNS record, as opposed to an ...


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You've added the records for a subdomain @.example.com instead of just plain example.com. While the use of @ to represent the root is a common syntax in some DNS tools, it's not supported in Route53. Adding the records with an empty Name field will place the records on the root of the domain.



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