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2

This sounds like expected behavior. Exactly what happens when the HTTP server receives a request that it does not know how to deal with can differ, but no redirect is expected unless it happens at the HTTP level. A CNAME record is merely stating that a given name in DNS is an alias of a different name in DNS. What happens when you have a CNAME record in ...


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You are asking for the NS record of www.timeandbill.de. That is not the same as the NS record of timeandbill.de. That is a specific record type you are asking for, which returns no answer as you don't have those configured. You should query for an A or AAAA record. So unless you want the subzone www.timeandbill.de delegated to different DNS servers ...


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Here is a simple process to get from registering a new domain to having browser requests arrive at the web server. Yes it could be made more fancy, but the focus is on simple in order to clear away the common confusion about different roles of the registrar and Route 53. At your domain host (registrar), register your domain. Eg mydomain.com. If they ask ...


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I was wondering if AWS Route 53 offers the creation and removal of sub-domains using an API call that I can generate from my backend. You can definitely use the Route 53 API to create sub-domains, but you don't actually need to. (e.g. USERNAME.mywebapp.com) To support this you only need a *.mywebapp.com wildcard DNS record, as opposed to an ...


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Depending on what access level you have to your hosting environment and if you are running an Apache web server you may also be able to use Apache VHosts service. See this article: domain redirection with virtualhost


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You've added the records for a subdomain @.example.com instead of just plain example.com. While the use of @ to represent the root is a common syntax in some DNS tools, it's not supported in Route53. Adding the records with an empty Name field will place the records on the root of the domain.


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Each Route 53 hosted zone is going to have it's own name servers. So for each of example.com and example-x.com, you need to set the name server settings at your registrar to be the name servers displayed on each hosted zone. set the name servers for example-x.com to be that of example.com Most likely, the name servers will be different, so this is the ...


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If by name servers, you mean NS records, they may be different for each hosted zone. The NS records for example-x.com will be present in the hosted zone records, so you can verify. Once you have your NS records pointing to the proper place (assuming your registrar is not AWS), it is simply a matter of setting up identical A records in each hosted zone, ...


7

It's not actually correct that the SPF RR type is the newer standard (in the context of desired SPF behavior). The experimental phase of the SPF specification had a new record type assigned but the migration path was unclear and it has since been abandoned. The current version of the SPF spec specifically states: SPF records MUST be published as a DNS ...


3

Yes, duplicate them; I don't know offhand what ratio of SPF checkers actually support the current standard for record type, but if I were to make a wild guess I'd wager that probably 10% of checkers won't look at an SPF record, only TXT.


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That it not something you can change with DNS records. Your application/web server is configured to redirect requests to app.web-app.com. If/how that can be changed depends on the app in question. To learn more about this, read about how HTTP works.


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Yes. boto.route53.connection.create_hosted_zone() appears to be what you want.



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