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3

Short answer: it doesn't. You need to account for application state (which includes uploaded files) in your application. A frequent design pattern for uploadednfiles is to use S3 for storage instead of your local file system Another option would be to have a long-running (non-ASG) storage server that exports a filesystem via NFS to your application ...


3

No, just create a A record (or whatever you need) and point it against the server you want.


2

You tagged this amazon-vpc, but the behavior you describe is what happens when an instance is launched in EC2-Classic. When you launch an instance in a VPC, it is assigned a private IP address and it remains for the lifetime of the instance. Their documentation is pretty clear on that point. To be clear, 'instance' in this case is a discrete 'i-' number. ...


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Since you're running your environment on AWS, I'm hoping that you're environment is setup using CloudFormation templates or any of the services built upon it (e.g. Elastic Beanstalk). With that assumption, I'm gonna propose the following: Spin up an exact copy of your environment in a separate VPC Create your load test scripts, starting with a lower amount ...


2

No, the data will not be synced. The typical approach on AWS is to have your application upload the files to Amazon S3 instead of leaving them on an individual instance. This can be done on the client side using JavaScript (http://www.plupload.com/ is what I've used in the past for this) or on server-side in your script.


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It can't be anything else, since S3's REST interface does not support a "move" or "rename" operation, only the "put/copy" operation, which allows objects to be copied inside S3 from one key to another (including across buckets, even when the buckets are in two different regions, as long as a single set of credentials has sufficient privilege) without the ...


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setup a local nameserver (eg dnsmasq) and insert the CNAME records you need into that. dnsmasq.conf: cname=alias,horrible-long-hostname.example.com resolv.conf: nameserver 127.0.0.1


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I havent worked with much AWS, but the general way of doing it will be as follows. Let say currently you have example.com hosted in Route53, so Route53 is the authoritative nameserver for your example.com zone. Now if you want a subdomain called client.example.com which again needs to point to the same IP address where example.com. So in that case create ...


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If all you are trying to do is simplify ssh'ing to that system, you can use an ssh config file. Create and edit ~/.ssh/config to contain: Host db: Hostname my-db.ooxxooxxooxxoo.ap-northeast-1.rds.amazonaws.com After that, a simple "ssh db" will lookup what's specified in your .ssh/config file and connect you.


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...I encountered a similar problem with my account. I found (through trial and error) that when I used the wrong region identifier, I was getting the Errno 8. Here's what worked: us-west-2 Here's what didn't work: us-west us-west-2a I couldn't find any definitive help about what would work (or not work) when specifying a region identifier, so ...


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Actually, I don't think there is a compiled list of services that allow paths in ARNs for a service's resources. And I'm not really sure why you would need this, however, by going through example ARNs for all services you could probably figure it out all by yourself! :)


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Do you have your RDS instance in a VPC? Are you sure that your RDS instance has the "Publicly Accessible" setting set to "Yes"? If you want to be able to access your RDS instance from outside your VPC, you need to switch that option to "Yes".



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