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4

I noticed you're using the db.micro instance. As with EC2, the micro instances are designed to be budget-friendly, but at a cost of performance. That said, you'll get a much worse performance when loading these types of servers versus the normal instances because the CPU time is given to the instance "last" compared to other instances sharing the same ...


4

I believe this question generally comes under the header of "shopping" or "software suggestions", but I'll try to offer an answer. Typically, you don't really need DDoS protection if you're running on Amazon Web Services. This is because Amazon's infrastructure is good enough to absorb most attacks before they reach you, if you run your own services ...


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Blocking IP adresses will be a race you can't possibly win. These request usually come from botnets or hacked systems. I would suggest blocking IP just as a temporary solution to a concrete incident where the requests cause problems on you side. I'm not aware of such a list Both will work. But I assume (not tested) that just ignoring the requests will ...


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This means that a new inbound rule needs to be applied to the security group for RDS that allows this new EC2 instance to connect to RDS via port 5432 (postgresql). Rather than using public IPs for your security group rules, I suggest using private IPs. Run both EC2 and RDS in the same VPC, then allow the entire VPC subnet IP range containing your ...


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You can create a new iptables chain which can be separately flushed and refreshed. $ iptables -N AWS $ iptables -I INPUT 1 -j AWS From here, just add all of the IP ranges to the AWS chain. To refresh the rules, simply iptables -F AWS and re-populate. For example: $ iptables -F AWS $ iptables -A AWS -s 50.19.0.0/16 -j REJECT If you want to automate ...


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I've fixed this on github.com/s3tools/s3cmd master branch. It was introduced in the new signature v4 code, but does not need to be a warning(), but instead lowered to info() which won't output on normal runs.


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I recommend to use AWS Cli instead of S3cmd. AWS cli is official tool for this by amazon. easy to install & use. also well documented. To copy from a bucket to another. use s3 cp, example: aws s3 cp s3://mybucket/ s3://mybucket2/ --recursive --exclude "mybucket/another/*" To change permissions/acl public read for a bucket (this includes objects in ...


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Naming conflicts are a known problem with the OpsWorks cookbooks and there isn't an easy solution. What you might have to do is download both community nginx and nginx-passenger cookbooks to your cookbook directory, rename the nginx cookbook to something like nginx-community then update any references in the nginx-passenger cookbook from nginx to ...


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Will, in general, blocking by IP address work? I know it's been a long time since "IP Address == unique device on Internet", but I'm wondering if these sort of probes generally come from the sort of networks where it'd be safe for me to just block them outright You can quite easily block many of the requests using a simple .htaccess file. There ...


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First, use nslookup to query your name servers (listed in the Route53 management console when you select your zone) directly. You do it like this: nslookup my.query.com ns-????.awsdns-??.??? If this query doesn't give you the right results, the issue is between the AWS console and Amazon's servers, so you should contact them. If this looks OK (like I ...



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