Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Provide your script via "user-data" during your launch process and it will be executed upon first boot. If you're using awscli, use the --user-data option" $ aws ec2 run-instances --image-id ami-xxxxxxxx --count 1 --instance-type m1.small --key-name foo-key --security-group-ids sg-xxxxxxxx --subnet-id subnet-xxxxxxxx --placement AvailabilityZone=us-west-2a ...


5

Do you have to? No Should you? Yes Why Private Keys? You can configure SSH access a number of different ways. private/public key pair is a common (and SECURE) method for Linux servers and the default method for Ubuntu AMIs. Where can you store your private key? You can store your private key in a secure location (a shared disk or USB might work if ...


4

Sounds like you are looking for a Virtual Private Network (VPN). You can configure this to put your EC2 instance on the same logical network as your home network and traffic between them goes over a secure private connection. Amazon provide VPN access with their Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) but there are also a number of open source implementations of VPNs ...


4

If it's reinstantiating itself then you've probably got it in an auto-scaling group. Delete that auto-scaling group (or reduce the minimum instance count to zero).


3

Capistrano is setup to use the production environment, but whatever command/script/etc you are using to actually start the Rails app on the box is likely in development mode. export RAILS_ENV=production bin/rails s


3

You would enter all the TXT values at the same time...even the one that already exists. Example: route53 --zone example.com -c --type TXT --name example.com --values "text1","text2","text3" See here as well: http://superuser.com/questions/573305/unable-to-create-txt-record-using-amazon-route-53


3

There's nothing that requires both of these, but as long as you're already creating both, you might as well continue doing so, to support a "defense in depth" philosophy. Security groups are more like iptables rules (software firewall in the Xen host's networking stack), whereas network ACLs are at the network layer and as such, traffic blocked by them is ...


3

I just became aware of this question, so I thought I'd chime in. I'm an engineer with Chef who has looked into this issue. The accepted answer on this is the correct way you can get around this issue. Note that following the accepted answer will also allow you to reconfigures and keep the setting the same, since that is an issue in another one of the ...


3

You can use sudo command or sudo su for root access in Amazon ssh. Try sudo mkdir prestashoptest or use sudo su followed by the password for ec2-user and perform the simply mkdir


2

The 1st thing I notice is that you weren't ssh'ing with the public key. When you created the AWS instance, you should have been prompted to download the keys. Assuming you did that, then your ssh should look like (from any terminal program like puTTY or iTerm) ssh -i keyname.pem ubuntu@remotehost Once you're logged in as the ubuntu user, you need root ...


2

Does SE1 license allow to go with higher than 8 vCPU and > 30GB RAM From page 11 of the Oracle Software Investment Guide: Oracle Standard Edition One provides companies the total power of Oracle Database at an affordable entry price. Oracle Standard Edition One may only be licensed on servers that have a maximum capacity of 2 sockets. And ...


2

Are us-east-1a, us-east-1b, and us-east-1d considered one or three availability zone? Three AZs within one region. Say I have two instances within us-east-1a, one has a mongodb server, the other has a nodejs app. Do I need to add permissions for port 27017 (mongodb) to the security group for the app server to connect to the mongo server? ...


2

Security groups won't be visible, because VPC security groups have no meaning outide their VPC... and your Classic instance is (of course) outside the VPC. Private VPC IP addresses of the instances won't work in the security config, either, since they also have no meaning outside the VPC. The solution is that you have to open up access (in the RDS security ...


2

A lot of people tend to over-think this. Just think of these servers as if they were deployed in a colo or in a corporate datacenter. In that case, how would you back them up? Likely it would be via a "legacy" backup product (Netbackup, Amanda, BareOS, etc.) that is connected to a tape library or VTL. This is something you should consider doing for your ...


2

I was getting this error when I was trying to deploy a Ruby application to the 64bit Amazon Linux 2014.03 v1.0.4. Switching to the 64bit Amazon Linux 2014.03 v1.0.3 stack resolved the issue and I was able to crate the EB application.


2

For posterity, this is a 4 step process. Bastion host refers to the public facing server, which you'll want to harden against potential attacks and through which your connections will travel to servers within your private subnet. Step 1: Enable IP Forwarding (Bastion Host) SSH to the bastion host and at the prompt, execute the following command: echo 1 ...


2

As @ceejayoz pointed out, new EBS volumes have a first-write penalty... but they also have a first-read penalty, particularly if created from a snapshot (or AMI, since those are backed by snapshots). You should pre-warm the volume, if you haven't already. It's not too late to do it, as you can do it nondestructively. It only needs to done once per ...


2

Use the nginx realip module, and then you don't have to worry about the X-Forwarded-For header; you can just act on IP addresses as if the load balancer wasn't there. A sample configuration: http { real_ip_header X-Forwarded-For; set_real_ip_from 172.19.0.0/16; # Netblock for my ELB's


2

Have you seen this? This topic describes how to add user data to a launch. http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/user-data.html This allows you to run a script once at launch, but you would have to specify the same user data each time you launch the AMI. Are you looking to have the same script run every time this AMI launches without ever ...


2

If it works when you run it directly but not from cron there is probably something different in the environment. You can save your environment interactively by doing set | sort > env.interactive And do the same thing in your script set | sort > /tmp/env.cron And then diff /tmp/env.cron env.interactive and see what matters. Things like PATH are ...


2

Make sure your security groups are fully set up properly. Each rule in a security group consists of 3 parts the protocol (TCP,UDP,etc), the port range, and the source IP address. Protocol / Range The first two can also be set via common protocols (SSH, SMTP, etc). IP Address There are three options for the IP address: "Anywhere", "My IP", and ...


2

Note where it says "In rare cases..." It isn't that the Cloudfront access logs aren't reliable, it's just that with Cloudfront, the logs are not guaranteed to absolutely, completely, precisely, and perfectly account for each and every last request that may have been processed, nor is there a guarantee that Cloudfront will never find old, stranded log ...


2

There is no cost to creating additional CloudFront distributions, so I would recommend creating at least one distribution per-client. Combined with the AWS usage report, one distribution per client would allow you to see fairly detailed information. The usage report is different from the access logs. Review the documentation: CloudFront Billing and Usage ...


2

This is trivial using the AWS CLI. First, get your hosted zone id: $ aws route53 list-hosted-zones { "HostedZones": [ { "ResourceRecordSetCount": 15, "CallerReference": "A5A5A3AF-C239-39FB-DA4C-556BA9FD1767", "Config": {}, "Id": "/hostedzone/Z1LVCQHJBJUCM5", "Name": "example.com." ...


2

AWS doesn't offer any other way to verify an individual email except for receiving the email and clicking the link.


1

To answer your questions: No the instance does not auto-update you need to configure that (Amazon Linux is very much like CentOS - you will find instructions for that) You use an instance which is reachable from the internet and hop to the instances in the private VPC from this one (gateway) You just need to make sure your ACL and security groups are set ...


1

It depends on how the instance was created in the first place. If the instance was created with OpsWorks, then please see: http://docs.aws.amazon.com/opsworks/latest/userguide/workinginstances-delete.html Otherwise, have a look please make sure that DeleteOnTermination is set to true. More documentation about this can be found at: ...


1

All of your permission denied-like error messages are showing, that you are doing your deeds as a simple user. They are not allowed to change such important system files, as sshd_config. You had to log in as root, or elevate privileges to root with the sudo bash command.


1

As per my understanding, you need to modify your chef recipe (i.e. learn a bit of chef) to change PHP version installed. Else you would keep on running into issues and even if you install a different PHP version, chef would automatically try to revert it as this is what it is supposed to do.


1

It appears there's a problem with SUSE on AWS the past few days. https://forums.aws.amazon.com/thread.jspa?messageID=559135 Apparently the DigiCert High Assurance EV Root CA cert has expired this afternoon. This appears to affect other systems as well. https://blog.digicert.com/expired-intermediate-certificate/ ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible