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4

Apache won't bind to your VIP because it is not configured on any network interface. To allow this to happen, you need to set a sysctl: sysctl net.ipv4.ip_nonlocal_bind=1 Apache can then do the bind, but of course no traffic will flow until the VIP is assigned to the machine.


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On my VPS, I want to block access of certain IP addresses to the whole server. Use a firewall e.g. iptables -I INPUT -s 192.0.2.1 -j DROP or iptables -I INPUT -s 192.0.2.1 -p tcp --dport 80 -j DROP Also if I want to block a whole range of IP addresses, ege 123.123.123.[0-255], how would I do it? iptables -I INPUT -s 192.0.2.0/24 -j DROP or ...


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In your httpd.conf check if you have an older 'Listen' directive active. By appending the new directive you can have two directives clashing. Else check if another process is listening on port 80 by running this: netstat -plant Hopefully you see something like this and kill it: Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address State ...


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You didn't mention, what router you are using. If your router has a web interface (which I guess, it has), then it is using the port 80 for it's web management interface and listening to incoming request. So when you want to forward port 80, it is possible that it won't work the way you expect. Some routers won't even allow to add such a rule. What you can ...


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I don't know if you still need the answer, but I hope I will help someone else by sharing my experience. I believe if you follow theese steps, everything will work fine. Make sure you have proper DNS entry for SYD01TBUG02 (A record) on your DNS server pointing to your webserver Make sure that you've you have assosiation between SPN of your webservice and ...


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You don't need mod_rewrite for this <VirtualHost *:80> ServerName www.example.com ServerAlias example.com Redirect "/" "https://www.example.com/" </VirtualHost > But if you really want to use mod_rewrite <VirtualHost *:80> ServerName www.example.com ServerAlias example.com RewriteEngine On RewriteCond ...


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That is how MySQL works. DBMS should guarantee so-called "integrity" (ACID-ity) of data so most of operations have lock an access to the specific table(s). Until operation will be completed no other operation should be started at any circumstances. All queries are queued in the line and performed one by one sequentially. Some DB-engines allow to lock not ...


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I'd rather comment but I don't have the reputation. This question was asked and answered here: Apache virtual host based on *source* IP



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