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t1lib was removed from Ubuntu 14.10 because it was removed from Debian, which is upstream of Ubuntu. And it was removed from Debian because it appears to have been abandoned by its upstream maintainers, and has years worth of security issues. It is probably not coming back. The t1lib web site hasn't been updated in so long that its download links are dead, ...


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I had a similar issue, I created a new sources.list file which held only the sources I wanted Apticron to work with And then I changed the Apticron code so it will use the file I created. sudo grep "-security" /etc/apt/sources.list | sudo grep -v "#" > /etc/apt/security.sources.list Above command will create a new sources list specifically for ...


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I was having the same problem, but I figured it out!!! (I went to comment this on the original answer because other people seem to be having this problem too, but I guess I don't have enough magic points for my opinion to be valuable, so here goes.) It's a quirk of the values he chose for apt-pinning. When you run apt-get install my_package, apt chooses ...


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Copy the error message to a file, for example 111.txt. Then run command for package in $(cat 111.txt | grep "warning: files list file" | sed "s/'//g" | sed "s/`//g"|awk '{print $8}'); do apt-get purge "$package" -y; apt-get install "$package" -y;done


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Unix.SE has two good answers for this: If you only want to disable IPv4 for APT, and you run Debian wheezy or *buntu saucy, or newer, that is, APT 0.9.7.9~exp1 or newer, you can use the Acquire::ForceIPv4 option, either on the command line (-o Acquire::ForceIPv4=true) or in apt.conf (Acquire::ForceIPv4 "true";). If you want to prefer IPv4 over IPv6 ...


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After reading APZ's answer, but wanting to use aptitude I executed with success the following commands: # clean the obsolete cache sudo aptitude clean # update the package information sudo aptitude update # install or upgrade the packages sudo aptitude install <list of packages to upgrade/install> The error is probably related to obsolete apt cache ...


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Why not replace the config file before installing the update? If it loads on restart, it won't use the "wrong" config file till after the update restarts it . . .


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You can get a list with this command: sudo unattended-upgrade --dry-run -d 2>&1 > /dev/null | grep 'Checking' | awk '{ print $2 }'



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