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34

I have a lot of understanding for your users. You are doing a fundamental error of system administration: You create a solution that is easy for the sysadmins, but forget the needs and requirements of the users. 200mb per user is simply insane, and it is a limitation that causes problems for them, as they have to bother with archives and backups. This is ...


26

Hard drives are unsuitable for anything other than short term archival storage. The problem is not one of data retention, it's the fact that stored drives have a bad track record for not spinning up. Contrary to what Vilx- wrote, many of us know what happens to a drive that's been stored for 20 years - they won't spin up 90+% of the time. "Modern" drives ...


7

The best answer re: archiving data is to move it to new media periodically and not to rely on any given type of media to "go the distance". If you want to see examples of "extreme" data archive maintenance read about CERN and their migration of data between tape "silos" (large robotic tape loaders with multiple drive and picker elements) of different tape ...


6

There are specific systems that internally use DVDs and migrate the data to new media every so often. Look up digital preservation. Since the storage requirements rise pretty quickly, it is advisable to switch to a newer, bigger type of media every few years anyways. Assuming you get the data in paper form, you need to: List the data at mail entry. ...


5

Keeping the data in a format like PDF is probably safe, because there are Free tools to read it. The volume of data you're talking about is fairly small (1,200 pages / year) so even at a 300 dpi scan resolution you're only talking about tens of gigabytes per year. The physical storage device problem is never going to go away, though. Whatever media you use ...


5

Only because only optimists seem to answer so far, I have to put my fly into the ointment. (Note that I have zero experience with storing HDDs). Will your HDD demagnetize over time ? What is the strength of magnetic field near it's storage ? (earth magnetic field, speakers, motors, nearby power cables, transformators, wireless phone chargers). Will it's ...


5

One of the rules of thumb is that the smaller the magnetic domain, the easier it is to flip it. One of the reasons that spaceflight hardware is so less powerful than what we use down here is because high density electronics are much more vulnerable to things like cosmic ray strikes and high radiation. Long-term storage has similar concerns, as the amount of ...


4

Personally, I wouldn't trust hard disk drives for any type of long-term archiving. The "something changing" concern is certainly reasonable, but I'd also be concerned that hard disk drives aren't designed to be a long-term archival storage medium. If I was going to archive data on disks I would want the data stored in the least-proprietary format possible. ...


4

Auto Archiving is a client feature and thus you'd need control of the clients to turn it off. With that being said, if your hope is to just store everything in the mailbox instead of an archive, you'd be better off disabling the ones you can via group policy and sending a notice to all as to why they no longer need to auto-archive. Assuming you're trying ...


4

I think the answer to this depends on the type of data the company are archiving and if there are legal issues around what they have to keep and where. e.g. If there is legislation saying they must keep x years of data in a secure format, etc, etc. To be honest, if it was under 4TB or so and it wasn't PCI DSS data or anything, I would consider using a ...


4

You want to download the Exchange 2007 Management Tools (32 bit) from here depending on your service pack level on Exchange. (Which is the full Exchange installer - see steps below) Once downloaded, run setup.exe and do steps 1-3: Install Microsoft Exchange. Setup copies the setup files locally to the computer on which you are installing Exchange 2007 In ...


3

The simpliest solution to me is to use syslog or one of its derivatives (rsyslog, syslog-ng) to send all logs to central servers. (Plural because you may want to have some kind of failover for security, or load-balancing if the log volume is very high) Primary components you need are: Compress logs with the most efficient algorithm you can afford ...


3

Well first of all, chin up. You've been asked to provide a technical solution to a management problem. It seems to me that the people you work for need to do one of two things: Provide you timely information about which projects are complete, so they can be archived; or Increase the size of the online storage (V drive). Still, you're looking for a way ...


3

I think Amazon's new Glacier service is an interesting offering in this space. Amazon Glacier is optimized for data that is infrequently accessed and for which retrieval times of several hours are suitable. With Amazon Glacier, customers can reliably store large or small amounts of data for as little as $0.01 per gigabyte per month, a significant savings ...


3

The best way to encourage users to take up a new service, is to make sure that it is better than what you currently provide, otherwise what's the point. I would make sure they have the ability to store more than 200mb, or are trained in how to prune their mailboxes of large attachments, although lets be honest, who really does this? We moved away from ...


3

It's really easy. Well it's easy to say and easy to understand. Might be difficult to do, however. Simply put, you need to understand your users problems, and then you need to solve their problems, not the IT Department's problems. If they are using PST files then find out why and address that. If they are reluctant to change then find out why and address ...


3

Our solution: Scan to PDF -> Backup to Tape We have a document scanner, does ~30 pages/min and produces OCRed PDF files. We back those up to Tape (LTO4 specifically) which has a shelf life of 50 to 100 years (finding a tape drive might be difficult in the time frame, but there are data recovery places that will still recover 8" floppy disks around).


3

I suggest 2TB drives in RAID 1. If you need speed, upgrade to the 32MB Cache and RAID 0+1.


3

As there is a less easily replaced mechanical part to a drive, I would suggest that taps would last longer (if the tape real won't wind you can take the magnetic tape out and put it in another cassette more easily than you could move the platters of a drive if it stops spinning up or the heads refuse to move). In either case there are three important things ...


3

How much data are we talking about? Our "archive" data is small enough that we just keep it in live storage (on a NAS unit) which gets backed up with the usual live data, so it exists just as our usual data does and is subject to the same recovery techniques without having to worry about keeping decade-old technology around. If our live data moves to a new ...


3

In my case, we do archives to tape, and I will tell you why it makes sense for us. First of all, the software we use, Tivoli Storage Manager, is hands down, the software we will be using for the foreseeable future. In my opinion TSM is the top of the food chain in terms of enterprise backup software, so the problem of changing to a different software ...


3

Since archiving digital data has been a subject of research for a while now, a number of papers and recommendations exist on this topic. Protecting digital assets for the long term by Joe Jurneke is a recent one trying a comparison between tape and HDDs for archival purposes. In summary, it makes the following points: HDDs are subject to "infant mortality" ...


2

How large and frequent are your backup? Generally for backup, you can get away with using SATA drives as performance isn't that important. You may want to look into starting with a HP MSA shelf directly attached to a server. That would let you use either SAS or SATA drives. I would also recommend at least RAID 5, if not RAID 0 with one or more hot spares, ...


2

For a while I used our old mostly decomissioned no longer on support SAN. It had something like 3T of raw space in 15k RPM SCSI drives. I could push them pretty much to the limits with NetBackup using it as a disk target for backups. We just had RAID5 run across each shelf of disk so we could get some redundancy but mostly speed. It depends on how many ...


2

The more, the merrier. Use RAID6, so you can suffer two drive failures.


2

I trust disks for precisely the length of their warranty, not a moment longer. For the kinds of disks I use that's almost always 5 years and I'd be happy to use a disk that's been sat around for 4.5 years for a further 6 months or so.


2

For home use, there are tons, Cobian Backup is okay, and then there are always the online based ones such as Mozy and Carbonite. If you just want to "archive" them to DVD's or something, then any good old burning software would suffice, as for testing them, I would just pop the DVD in and try to read a few files off of it. You might consider external hard ...


2

I've used Cobian Backup to pretty good success on my 3 Windows machines. It has a ton of built-in features, including encryption, compression, and remote/FTP backups. The scheduler is pretty detailed as well, and can start jobs that were missed if the computer or network was down.


2

Ack, I hate tapes. If you don't require a lot of archival stuff, I would look into getting a Drobo Pro + some kind of online backup ( Dropbox, CrashPlan, JungleDisk etc. ). The Drobo is dead simple, just add sata drives, and it will auto expand / protect your data.


2

If you're not absolutely committed to disk, I may be so bold as to suggest an alternative... LTO is cheap these days (especially considering the amount of storage you can get on them) and even a single slot LTO4 drive will have ample capacity for your requirements. You say you're using 3+ tapes per backup and changing all 6 every other day? That indicates ...



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