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8

Some of the considerations: Mail limits on other email systems, not everyone likes receiving 150MB attachments. Bounces will annoy YOUR users (and consume their quota, if any), and generate calls. Any mailbox size quotas you have in place. Large attachments make hitting them a LOT easier. Large-attachment virus scanning overhead. If your mailer is ...


6

I have a 10MB attachment limit set on my Exchange server for the following reasons. First of all, those huge 20MB PowerPoint presentations that people send around are taking up space on my server which would be better placed on a network drive/in SharePoint (this isn't necessarily an issue if your mail server only delivers mail rather than storing it too). ...


4

IMHO no, at least I can't think of any good reason. Actually, it doesn't increase security, but decreases it. They should implement a good virus scanner at the mail gateway (and on the client workstations) and with this, mostly eliminate the zip threat. After that, if they manage to educate their users that they shouldn't open files they didn't expect and, ...


4

Sounds like a company I worked for once. :( Here's the thing we discovered when forced to that same bit of lunacy. Every one of the six antivirus scanners that checked incoming mail detected that they were zip files, regardless of what we named them. No real surprise there. As they have configured those scanners to block zip files it didn't matter that we ...


3

There are a lot of different ways you can save space on Exchange 2003. Here is a good article which explains a couple ways. There is also a program with Exchange 2003 that comes with the Exchange Resource Kit called EXMERGE that can be used to remove and delete objects within your mailbox folders.


2

We used to have the joy of only accepting zips that were prepended with our company initials at the start of the filename - xxMyZippedFile.zip In theory this stops automated Bot viruses from being received, perhaps it even worked, but it annoyed & confused the hell out of a lot of users!


2

If you are meaning for incoming mail and/or internal, then space is the only real factor unless there are store size problems with your mail system (if you specify what mail system you are using people may be able to give you specific hints there) - though make sure your users know there are often better ways to distribute large content and make sure you ...


1

Microsoft has issued a hotfix, available here, for this issue. It will be rolled into Outlook 2007 SP3 (whenever that's released). From the article: Consider the following scenario: Your mailbox is moved to Microsoft Exchange Server 2010. In Office Outlook 2007, you open an email message that contains an attachment. The message was sent by ...


1

We had a similar issue with Exchange 2007 + outlook 2007. calendar invites sent from outlook express by client once received and accepted, the response which was sent back, the user found the response as above. We had raised a ticket with MS and they confirmed it is a bug is Exchange 2007 and outlook express client. Not sure abt Exchange 2010 whether ...


1

Are you using Firefox (or even if not) and do you have any add-ons that could be blocking this If not, I would go to the Exchange server and check the OWA settings, or downloading the OWA admin pack and make sure no weird options are set.


1

The little I know of this issue is that this happens normally when someone with Outlook Client sends an email in "Outlook Rich Text" format. (Available to change from Tools|Options| Mail Format|Internet Format). A non-Outlook client can't read this and just has an email with winmail.dat as an attachment. We fixed this for people by making the default ...


1

seems pretty silly to rename absolutely every zips to text files. for us, we allow in any standard zips, but executables and other potential nasties will be stripped out. if the user really needs these files, then the sender can rename the extension to our company initials before sending. no calls required after that point. password protected zips get ...


1

The Exchange size-limit is indeed the size of the actual message, not the decoded attachment size. So yes, you will have to do the math. Base64 encoding doesn't change from Exchange version to Exchange version, they've consistently been limiting on the size of the message in the mailer-queue (i.e. encoded). That size is the full size of the message in the ...



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