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22

It is exactly as you say: The whole concept of public key authentication is that the private key should only be known to the owner, while the corresponding public key can be widely disseminated. The security of your authentication depends on the security of the private key, not of the security of the public key. The fact that somebody else provides you ...


9

For that key, the organization don't have non-repudiation. IE, if someone does something abusive or destructive to that system using 'your' key, the admin can't point the blame at you for being solely responsible for it. Since the person that gave it to you also had the key. It probably isn't that bad for you, since it gives you a defense, but horrible ...


1

The server didn't accept the key your client provided. The client provided only "/Users/kosmos/.ssh/id_rsa_old", guessing that's not the key that's in your authorized_keys file on the remote server. Check the auth.log on the server, it should contain something helpful as to why. If the public key for that id_rsa_old is in your authorized_keys file on that ...


1

Time have changed. There was a time when every system's administrator could be reached at the hostmaster address for that server. Connectivity once depended on knowing an administrator who would allow you access, and a routing map between systems was regularly published. Those days are long gone and security threats are wide-spread. The userid > 1000 ...



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