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24

Why, hello there Lars! That's a fascinating question you've asked, and after some research I may have found an answer for you. According to this and other posts out there, it may be possible to set the VFCF_JAIL attribute on the NFS filesystem provider, which would in theory allow jails to perform NFS mounts. This may, in turn, allow one to run amd inside ...


11

/etc/fstab is the traditional configuration file to define permanent mounts.


7

What is the reason that you need to map a drive? Is it just so that you can store the user credentials? If the security PC can save to a UNC path (\\servername\share), then you could try running the service as a different user, one that has permission to access the share. Let me know if I am on the right track here: \\nasbox\SecurityFootage is where the ...


5

From the Ubuntu documentation, try installing usbmount. sudo apt-get install usbmount Here is the description from the repo: automatically mount and unmount USB mass storage devices This package automatically mounts USB mass storage devices (typically USB pens) when they are plugged in, and unmounts them when they are removed. The mountpoints ...


4

Instead of mounting zpool2 as /var/db, mount it as /zpool2 or /db or whatever makes sense for you. Then make /var/db a symlink to /db.


4

I think you have a cart before the horse problem here in that when you export a file system using NFS it locks on to the source direcotory. You are trying to not even have that source directory available at that time and only put something there via a mount later. This will not work, because once you give NFS a handle on something to share, it will always ...


4

assuming you have ntfs-3g installed, you can mount it by using mount /dev/sdX# -t ntfs-3g /media/MOUNTPOINT WHERE: X = letter (depends on your computer) # = number (partition number you want to mount) MOUNTPOINT = folder (where this disk would be mounted)


4

There should be an /etc/auto.smb already, use that, and add the following line to /etc/auto.master: /cifs /etc/auto.smb --timeout=60 Now all cifs shares will show up under /cifs: ls /cifs/<server> will show all the shares available. You might want to put some options in /etc/auto.smb to mount with specific modes. I have a auto.smb that I ...


3

It seems the crucial point where things break is: 15:36:09 aoldbsuse hald: mounted /dev/sdc1 ... 15:36:09 aoldbsuse multipathd: 360a98000572d5073536f68484c4c512f: failed in domap for addition of new path sdc It seems you do have hald-based automatic mounting in place, so you need to turn it off (no idea how, besides disabling entire hald). Chances are ...


3

Would you be satisfied with just df -T /mnt ? :)


3

udev is the key. Have a look at the files under /etc/udev/rules.d udev Howto Create your own udev rules


3

The file auto.master usually contains this line: /net -hosts An older alternative is (was): /net /etc/auto.net The first line is the so called builtin map referring to the file /etc/hosts and the second example is a so called program map (usually a simple shell script), which may better explain to you how the automounter works. I guess you have ...


3

You can set the file system mountpoint properties to legacy and use /etc/fstab to define them. That way, you'll be able to define the order in which they will be mounted. Edit: I just noticed you already considered the legacy approach. It might be the only one though.


3

I had similar problems with mounting a CIFS share on CentOS 6.3 64-bit - the documentation I found doesn't seem to document two additional arguments that need to be set up in the auto.master file for this to work. Here's what worked for me and might likely work for you (modified a little to fit your example): At bottom of /etc/auto.master: ...


2

I don't believe networking is up at the time at the time the filesystems are mounted. NFS mounts are started by a script in /etc/network/if-up.d/mountnfs. The comments in mountnfs script say it should also mount CIFS shares. You might want to try rebooting the system and then manually running the /etc/network/if-up.d/mountnfs script to see if any errors ...


2

Having just crammed up on udev to get USB stick to automount when not running a gui, (and not using autofs.) Yes veronica, udev does run awfully early. agent scripts can happily fork off and run after a sleep. udevadm settle might help you out here in addition to checking runlevel. action="Add" is run at boot, not just hotplug. Whether action="remove" ...


2

Check out Microsoft's DevCon utility, I use it to disconnect eSATA HDD's at the end of backup batch files so the users don't have to log in and 'safely remove' them before swapping drives. It might be able to at least help you accomplish some of what you're doing. :)


2

umount -f -l always works for me on hung nfs mounts.


2

The automounter has complete control of directories you configure it to use, so you would lose all local directories if you did that.


2

To answer your headline question yes, it is possible to mount your /media/ant from a .bashrc simply put mount /media/ant in the relevant file. Unfortunately you have to run mount as root so you have to arrange arrange for the particular user to be able to run mount as root e.g. via sudo. This gets complicated and introduces other security issues. As ...


2

It's pretty straightforward -- you just start the agent somewhere out of the way, feed it the key(s) of interest, then set the SSH_AUTH_SOCK environment variable in the environment of the sshfs process to point to the agent.


2

I just did this on a CentOS 5.6 box and I think part of your problem might be with your auto.test file. In it's current form you'll be creating a /test mount point and then a single moung of test under it, i.e. /test/test. Also you might want to add the --ghost switch to your auto.master line like so: /test /etc/auto.test --timeout=60 --ghost The ...


2

change server-ip -fstype=cifs,rw,noperm,user=DOMAIN\username,pass=password ://server-ip/share to share -fstype=cifs,rw,noperm,user=username,pass=password,domain=domain ://server-ip/share


2

You may want to look into the nohide NFS export option to recursively mount filesystem hierarchies. This is assuming the NFS exports are from a Linux system (versus a filer or NAS) and that you're interested in mounting its mounts to your client. Also see: http://www.digspace.org/linux/7-linux-nfs-nohide


1

Additionally to using the nohide option in the /etc/exports file on the NFS server as has been suggested in the previous answer is using the package autofson the clients which might be interesting to those not knowing that package yet. Doing this is simple: Install the package autofs on each client using a package manager Afterwards edit the client ...


1

The purpose of the automounter, is basically to only mount things when needed. If the maps are correct all the user would have to do is to cd to the area and it will automatically mount. Once not needed (no users needing the mount after a specified period of time), it will unmount the disk. The same would happen for the /home area as well if the login ...


1

regarding the type:=program mount/unmount commands, the infodoc for amd on OpenBSD mentions that the first element in the argument is the program to execute, and the second arg is what gets passed in as $0. so iow, if i did mount:="/sbin/mount_nfs -x10 -3 -dt600 -r32768 -w32768 -o rw,tcp.intr host:/path/${key} /local/${key}" i ended up getting: ...


1

Since I just spent my entire morning debugging this same issue. Let me explain what happened above. /etc/auto.master ## Mount this test share: /test /etc/auto.test --timeout=60 This means I want to mount something at /test and for the details read /etc/auto.test /etc/auto.test test ...


1

KERNEL!="sd[a-z]\d+?", GOTO="media_by_label_auto_mount_end"


1

I immediately thought that the USB drivers for the device, or whatnot, aren't getting loaded before fstab is "executed." So after googling "mounting usb drive fstab" I found this: http://solutionsandtips.blogspot.com/2009/05/uuid-fstab-and-automatically-mount-usb.html



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