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23

Run fire drills ... every couple of months it is a good idea to say XYZ system is down ... then actually go through the motions of bringing it back online to a new VM etc etc. It keeps things honest and helps you catch mistakes.


14

This really depends on how you are going to restore your system. If you will rebuild then you only need the configuration/data files for your services (eg: /etc, /opt, /var, /home) If you are after a full system restore, then it you could omit /proc, /boot & /dev. Then you can install the minimum OS from your boot media and then restore your system via ...


12

If you're looking for a Free/Open-Source Software tool, I can recommend http://www.clonezilla.org/


12

Here is something interesting to consider: Backing up the mysql database limits you greatly in that you can only restore such a database to the same version of mysql you ran the backup from. Here is why: Here is mysql.user from MySQL 5.0.45 mysql> desc mysql.user; ...


11

The -t argument will tell duplicity from what time to restore. duplicity -t 3D --file-to-restore FILENAME scp://uid@other.host/some_dir /home/me/restored_file Will restore FILENAME from 3 days ago.


11

The best way to convince management to spend money on IT expenses is to understand the relationship IT has to the business as a whole and how the IT department can best help the business thrive. Many business owners and managers see IT only as a cost center, often due to their lack of familiarity with the technology; likewise, many sysadmins view the ...


10

Yes... sort of. There are two things you can do here: If you put multiple A records in your DNS server for a given name, then they'll all be served to clients and those clients will pick one from the set to connect to, meaning that traffic will be "fairly" evenly distributed amongst all sites simultaneously. This isn't really what you seem to be ...


9

See The Tao Of Backup, chapter 1.


9

Hey I know a crazy method to create a slave without augmenting any operation of master (ServerA) or slave (ServerB) Step 1) Setup a New Server (ServerC) Step 2) On ServerC, Install MySQL (same version as ServerB) Step 3) On ServerC, service mysql stop Step 4) Copy /etc/my.cnf from ServerB to ServerC Step 5) On ServerC, change server_id to a value ...


9

Yes, you definitely want to backup the mysql database -- it's an integral part of your service. While you can reconstruct it's contents from other information, the difficulty of doing so is prohibitive if you're trying to get back to service quickly.


8

soapbox mode: ON I would say that its as simple that backups that isn't tested regularly is worthless. A my previous job we had a policy that every system (production, test, development monitoring etc.) should be test restored every 6 months. This was also the job of the most junior admin so that documentation was up to date. Junior being defined by how ...


8

You could just backup the entire /var/spool/cron directory. It contains all crontables of all users and more.


7

Both /proc and /sys are virtual filesystems which reflect the state of the system, and allow you to change several runtime parameters (and sometimes do more dangerous things, like directly writing to the memory or to a device). You should never backup or restore them. In most modern distributions, /dev is dynamically created at boot (it is a memory ...


7

You are doing at least one thing wrong. First of all you are using --fake-super on the wrong side of the connection. Let me quote the rsync man page. The --fake-super option only affects the side where the option is used. To affect the remote side of a remote-shell connection, specify an rsync path: rsync -av --rsync-path="rsync ...


7

It sounds like it might be worth it to perform a System State restore of a DC contemporaneous to the Exchange backups, find the user object, and examine the homeMDB attribute. That's going to give you the mailbox database name for sure, but you'll have to deal with putting up a DC "under glass" (don't connect it to your network at all after you perform the ...


6

Since you seem to be referring to the fact that the administrator doesn't notice that the backup job "breaks", and not so much that a working backup did not work right, I would suggest building some sort of monitoring scripts around the backups. When building a home-grown backup solution, I would do something like this: Build a script to back up your ...


6

You could look at some of the following: Ghost for Unix Partition Image Clonezilla, as mentioned above by mystikphish Device Image


6

You can dump the attributes of the files using getfacl -R * >perms.bak and recover them using setfacl --restore=perms.bak


6

Paraphrased from John's answer, "Treat the virtual as you would a physical machine". Any software/method to backup while running will work. You may also want a backup of the virtual machine's configuration file (.vbox) if the backup method doesn't already include it. Most bare-metal backups are done without the standard system running. Most ...


5

You mention 'secure file servers' in your question. I would see external backups as a potential risk - what if some steals one of these? In terms of data protection, unless the data is backed up properly by users you are likely to be in trouble. It is difficult to make sure this happens if the environment is hetereogenous as you state. You could: Have a ...


5

Try looking on this Lifehacker article: Five Best Free System Restore Tools. I think Macrium Reflect Free is probably the best of the bunch.


5

After much exploration I have found that this is possible! NB I don’t have any experience with XML so please excuse the terminology......also please backup any configuration files before making any of the changes suggested.. I could not find any references to this in the VirtualBox documentation or on any websites. In case anyone ever has the same problem ...


5

Yes. If you have the ldf file you've got a better chance of success. Simply take the mdf and ldf files are copy them to the new server. Then attach the database to the new instance using the sp_attach_db system stored procedure or using the SQL Server Management Studio. If you don't have the ldf file you can attach the database using just the mdf file ...


5

Backups are always hard to tune properly; especially because people have different needs, and such needs are usually a mix between data 'snapshot' backup, data archiving, server (config) backup, reliable service, etc). 3dinfluence and davey are both right: it's important to try the restore operation (as Joel says), and a set of cron scripts is usually the ...


5

There isn't "the" way to do this, but a whole pile of ways that depend on your needs. rsync can do enough copying that recovery is possible, but isn't necessarily the answer you need. Is using rsync on a hourly/daily basis to copy over the filesystem to an identical machine enough? Good question, is it? There are two issues that will present: You ...


5

Not quite the answer that you're looking for, but the name of the backup file can be found in a combination the backup* tables in msdb. Your restore process could query the production msdb, figure out the backup file name, and go from there. Aside from that, there's always powershell which gives you the perfect blend of file system and database access.


4

We have 60%-size 'Reference' versions of our 'Production' systems, we use them for final testing of changes, we restore 'Production' backups to these systems - it tests the backup plus ensures both environments are in step with each other.


4

The database .bak file contains information about where the backed up database held its mdf and ldf files. My guess is that it was designed this way to make restores super simple. To restore a backup to different locations (i.e. the new locations you want), you need to use some slightly advanced features: Using SQL Server Management Studio (see step 11) ...


4

Some of the special files in /proc and /sys confuse rsync. You don't want to back up mounted network filesystems either, usually. Sparse files can also cause problems. Add -x to limit it to one file system. That avoids all the network file systems and /proc etc. However you then need to run one rsync for each file system you have mounted. Add -S to handle ...


4

Unfortunately, no. The database formats are incompatible. You should be able to restore it to a SQL 2005 instance and then copy it to the 2000 instance via the copy db wizard.



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