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18

My recommendations: Always document and/or script the setup of each new instance so that you can reproduce the software installation and system configuration in the event you lose the instance. Test this by starting a new instance and following the procedure. You can use a custom, private AMI if the installation takes a long time and you need to start ...


13

Here's an example: I have some systems whose data changes frequently in a large number of flat files. Incremental backups take 90% the time of a full backup. So in that case, it makes sense to run full backups since there's little cost to doing so. Another situation is where the backup infrastructure is such that the data set can fit entirely within the ...


9

Full backups every day have one big advantage: the restore chain is a lot shorter. The more Incrementals you have to pull into a restore-set to get a certain state back, the more likely that one of those incrementals is bad in some way and will therefore spoil the entire restore. If you're doing a full backup every day, you only have one backup-set to ...


6

Your options should be dictated by your service-level agreements with your customers and limited by your budget. At the very minimum, you should have off-site backups of all critical data. That is to day, any data which you cannot recreate from scratch needs to be stored elsewhere. Offline backups are better: online backups or replication might help when ...


5

Can anyone recommend a SAN device Not really. Take a look at the offerings of major manufacturers and see what fits your needs. How do I back it up on and off site? You can approach things in several ways. For example, it may work best to have your file server image manage backups from inside it as if it were a real machine. For other machines, ...


3

Here is a T-SQL script I wrote for my backup automation that deletes all but the specified number of full backups and any differential backups that were created before the oldest retained full backup. It relies on the differential having the same file extension and the file name having "_Diff" appended to it. I have one for log files as well. Delete ...


3

There's not a lot of definitive information about hard drive reliability. There's Google's study, but that concerns lifetime of drives in use. In addition to media degradation, when you're talking about long-term storage, you need to worry about technological obsolescence. WORM media were supposed to last at least 50 years, but in order to read an old ...


2

Business Continuity goes much, much further than just making sure you've got access to readable backups. But confining the scope of the answer to just that, ultimately it's only going to be viable where the end-to-end bandwidth from the datacenter to the backup location is sufficient large to handle the volume of data changes. When you're talking about a ...


2

try looking into rsnapshot, should be in the package repo. It's based on rsync and i'm pretty sure will do what you need.


2

That's exactly what we do. We keep D2D backups of all our VMs; quick an easy recovery for the previous several months' backups. Every week we take a full tape backup offsite for safe keeping. The disk array cost quite a bit; but less than a single day of downtime; which would easily be possibly if the person who keeps the backup tapes was ...


1

That makes perfect sense to me. As for the space it will take up, because the local copy isn't the primary backup why not simply use external drives, which are quite inexpensive? Normally I discourage the use of hard drives for backup but in this scenario there is no reason not use them. If/when the drive(s) fails simply create a new copy using the off-site ...


1

check out synaman, we have used it in the past with great success


1

Exactly the product you want depends on the platform running on your servers in the data centre, but broadly the solution is in 2 parts: a central backup service running in the DC (or run by a 3rd party, in the case of Dropbox, Sugarsync etc), and an agent installed on users' laptops out in the field, which periodically sends incremental backups to said ...


1

We have a VPN from our office to our offsite datacenter. At the offsite datacenter we have server that has a network share mounted that we configure as a destination in our backup software (we run Symantec BackupExec) i.e. \OFFSITEDATACENTER\OFFSITESTORAGE We then do - a full backup over the weekend to that location - an incremental each evening As well ...


1

We have a number of separate active/active or active/semi-active data centres with >50 miles between them, different power suppliers, security, diversely-routed 10GBps meshed links between them, oh and we ship our backup disks between them too. This does for us.


1

regarding software - use whatever suits you. rdiff-backup is my favorite nowadays - orchestrated with backupninja under linux and some shadow-copy bat scripts under windows. but really anything that can take snapshot of your data should be fine. just make sure you: send it another quickly accessible location regularly store it offline [ get 2 usb drives, ...


1

Couple pointers: First, snapshots. Any backup operation (even an incremental backup, probably) is going to take a significant amount of time to complete. Unless you can lock your store while the backup is taking place, you will probably have a problem with inconsistent data. I suggest you investigate your fs and system possibilities for taking snapshots. ...


1

I haven't heard of this, which doesn't mean it isn't true, but is that from a reliable source? I have PCs that I didn't turn on for years, and they were fine when I did. Also, I have heard that about CDs as well, and have binders of old burned disks which are all fine (CDs are built to withstand some loss of data though). If it just that some of the ...


1

Re: Do inactive hard drives really degrade? I haven't heard it from anywhere official or particularly authoritative. The information I have is that the bearings in a drive can dry out if I leave the drive powered off for a long time. And then when the drive is turned back on, I guess the bearings would be frozen up and the drive is dead. I don't want to ...


1

Enterprises go to great lengths to ensure that not only their tapes last for 10 years: the drives to read the tapes hardware with the correct attachments and interfaces drivers and software capable of both reading the tapes and interfacing with existing and future systems. The failure rates of hard drives may be much higher than other components in a PC ...


1

Re: prolonging disk life, here are two equally valid yet totally contradictory schools of thought: Do not power or spin the drive at all unless you are doing a restore This is based on the theory that most hard drive failures are mechanical in nature, and that by not running the drive you don't induce any wear on the mechanical components, so when you need ...


1

Also check rdiff-backup. Similar to rsnapshot, with different tradeoffs in terms of disk efficiency and restore speed.


1

Should/can I also schedule a complete image/EBS task as well? yes, it's advisable. One time it saved me, because I had to reset many times because of kernel problems, until the boot disk was not readable anymore and I simply booted from the latest snapshot. If you're interested I wrote a Java class to snapshot all connected EBS volumes and also delete ...


1

The ultimate solution is two web servers in different locations using BGP to advertise the IPs used; if the primary goes down the secondary will take its place on the same IP in a few seconds. Depending on your needs, existing infrastructure and budget this may be ideal or impossible; can you give us a few hints regarding your web server setup and what you ...


1

If you create a Maintenance Plan, you can have Backup Tasks included in SubPlans. And in the SubPlan to backup the database (full, diff, tlog backups) you can have a Maintenance Cleanup Task. For each of the backup types, you can specify how long you want to retain the files. For instance, you can retain all backups for 7 days. After those 7 days, the ...


1

I use a CLR proc for this, posted the code at http://sqlblog.com/blogs/merrill_aldrich/archive/2009/07/21/hole-in-your-backup-sequence.aspx PowerShell might be better nowadays, but it'd be simple to port the C# code to PowerShell


1

Assuming you are following the best practice strategy of: NOT installing anything on the OS or temporary drive (since those get wiped each time the server reprovisioned/redeployed/gets moved in the rack of the datacenter), all you need to worry about is your data disks. Data disks in Azure use Azure Blob Storage (VHDs), therefore you can use a free tool ...


1

This would work. You have to add the code for sending the email inside the if condition and change LOGFILE to whatever you logfile path is: #!/bin/bash LOGFILE="logtest" COUNT=`tail -n16 $LOGFILE | grep "Volume in" | uniq -c | cut -c0-7 | tail -n1` echo "Last tape repeated $((COUNT)) times" if [ $COUNT -gt 3 ]; then echo "Sending email..." mutt ...



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