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23

Because the transfer speeds out of the ESXi console are purposefully limited. Because this isn't scalable in any way. Because you'd have to drop a statically-compiled rsync binary onto the ESXi host. Because the VMs, the VMDKs, their ramdisk files and other components can change enough to make rsync a losing proposition... do you really want to re-sync a ...


21

Rsync does a one way sync, however it's up to you to decide which way the sync goes. Rsync command syntax is the following: rsync [OPTION...] SRC... [DEST] Note that you specify sync from source to destination. Source and destination can be any local or remote path. For example if you want to copy files from your server to your laptop you do: rsync ...


6

There is generally no need to backup anything under dev, since it's mostly generated upon boot by udev. I did a lot of OS migrations by simply rsyncing everything except stuff like proc, dev, sys etc. Just make sure when you setup your backups, ALWAYS test a recovery, to see if everything is functioning properly.


6

my choice has been installing cygwin with rsync/ssh and run rsync command. Also in my case i have enabled cronjob with cygwin and run those sync overnight/weekend, where i backup otherway i.e. windows server data to linux.


4

I used to do just this a few years back. (edit: with VMWare running on CentOS hosts, not ESXi admittedly) Every night I had a script that would suspend a VM, rsync the files from disk to the backup server and then start the VMs again. It worked quite well except... Rsync doesn't work very well with a 2GB file. Its not because rsync isn't brilliant, it ...


4

No solution can be examined without knowing more about the threat model, ie, what are you trying to protect against? If you want to survive software failure on the part of your hosted image, then simply having two VMs should be fine; if one crashes, the other should still be there. If you want to survive software or hardware failure on the part of the ...


3

By default rsync will read the entire file on both source and destination, to verify that they are identical. This does not consume network bandwidth, as it will only be comparing a hash value. But it does spend time reading from the disk. In one usage scenario, I found this to be terribly inefficient because the source files were only being appended to. I ...


3

I would create a CIFS share on Windows and mount it on the Linux server. You could then use rsync or something like rsnapshot.


3

Judging by this question, I may get chastised for this but: Although not ideal, it's better than nothing. Personally, I'd go with something like Crashplan whose sole purpose is backup. However, anything that gets a secured copy of your data offsite is better than just keeping one copy of your data in house. Of course, take into consideration an appropriate ...


3

It will be pretty useless and you won't be able to transport a snapshot to another system for use. They depend entirely on the original VMDK's. Again, this isn't the purpose of VMware snapshots. They're really meant to be temporary and have major implications for storage performance and disk space.


3

No, this scheme is not considered safe, because if your (provider/host server/providers backup) goes down, you won't be able to restore your business. Safest backup is when your files are going to an absolutely different location - Dropbox, S3, Github, your own home PC, etc. If any disaster happens, with this setup, you can easily buy a new server ...


2

Here are a couple of alternatives. tar -ztf patch.tar.gz | grep -v "/$" | xargs -i sh -c 'test -f {} && echo {}' | tar -T- -zcvf backup.tar.gz or tar -ztf patch.tar.gz | grep -v "/$" | tar --ignore-failed-read -T- -zcvf backup.tar.gz The second example will exit with status zero after an attempt to backup a file that does not exist (tested on ...


2

Adding --inplace will help with big files greatly. It makes picking up after a failed or killed rsync faster because it doesn't use temporary files.


2

It depends for a large part on whether or not you want/need to download a full copy of your data as as one-off snapshots; or if your needs can be met with a solution that allows you to download the changes/delta's incrementally. If you do need a full copy each time you download the data; you might benefit greatly from creating a single compressed archive ...


2

I added the --ignore-existing command and it looks like it won't change anything and only download new files. rsync -vzr --ignore-existing -e Edit: When there are new files it still takes longer each cycle.


2

Rsyncing a single file is not a backup solution, what do you do when something happened to the vm and files were deleted, but you only noticed this after your rsync has run again? You will have overwritten the good 'backup' of your files with the bad image now. If you want backup you need to keep the old versions somewhere, or the diff's. Rsync will only ...


2

Don't use the -v option of rsync, instead use --out-format: rsync --out-format="%n%L" -az user@r18:~/assets ~/18 >> ~/18/rsync.log 2>&1 Will only have output when you are transfering files, and no output when you don't. To have more fancy output look at the rsync.conf man page, in the "log format" section.


1

I would use winscp for that. Open Source and free. Make a Task so that you run it once a week or so automatically. You should be able to script it according to your needs. Scripting Documentation of winscp No need to pay money for something trivial as that. For having the deleted files removed you might need some powershell scripts aswell though. ...


1

There is an option called --link-dest which does what you need. When this parameter points to your latest backup it will only copy files from src to dest if src is different from the data already in your last backup (referenced by --link-dest) ; if the data is the same it will create a symlink instead thereby giving you a whole versioned backup. I use this ...


1

Windows software mirror is not a true mirror and if your primary of the set dies you are left with a big paperweight. Granted your data is preserved, but the server will not be bootable as I have discovered. This is a poor backup solution (as is all RAID). A cheap backup is a USB hard disk. Use some simple software like Backup Assist and back up to the ...


1

You are missing the actual file you want to backup to start. s3cmd put /backup_dir/somefile.sql.gz s3://bucket/sql/ s3cmd takes two basic arguments, the file, and the bucket to backup too. Secondly, I can't take credit for the following, but its basically doing what you want with an intermediate script. Basically, create a bak.sh file with the ...


1

It's a group (Exchange Trusted Subsystem) not a user. If your samba share cannot find/add that AD group to the share and file level permissions there, it isn't going to work. Alternative would be to export it to a folder on the Exchange server itself and then just move the PST file across the network to the Linux samba share using a logged in user that has ...


1

For full system backups in EC2, you should go with EBS Snapshots. For data backup in S3/Glacier I would go with S3cmd in Linux systems and Cloudberry Backup tools in Windows (Not free, but worths each dollar). S3cmd is a simple command line tool you can use in your standard backup scripts to push a copy into a S3 bucket. For Glacier rotations, use S3 ...


1

Have a look at this URL for an overview of MySQL backups. http://www.iheavy.com/2012/08/09/5-things-you-overlooked-with-mysql-dumps/ You need to add the following argument to lock both db's. --lock-all-tables, -x "Lock all tables across all databases. This is achieved by acquiring a global read lock for the duration of the whole dump". Your command ...


1

Your best option is the following mysqldump --single-transaction --databases db1 db2 > db1_db2.sql The option --single-transaction creates a point-in-time window for all the data in the dump. The only restriction is that you do not execute any DDL ALTER TABLE CREATE TABLE DROP TABLE RENAME TABLE TRUNCATE TABLE Please see my DBA StackExchange post row ...


1

So what happens if I upload a file/archive, then later, the file changes locally, and the next time I do a backup, how does Glacier deal with this since it can't overwrite the file with a new version? Per the Glacier FAQ: You store data in Amazon Glacier as an archive. Each archive is assigned a unique archive ID that can later be used to retrieve ...


1

why do you say it takes longer each time? how is that possible? maybe it's the program generating the files that is touching them? try with --checksum: skip based on checksum, not mod-time & size, see if that changes anything (i wouldn't keep this option because it reads every file from the disk every time, too expensive, i'm only suggesting it to find ...


1

I think adding -t to your argument list will help. To verify this you could add --itemize-changes to the arguments (without -t). If I understood you correctly, this would show the T-flag in every line man 1 rspec: A t means the modification time is different and is being updated to the sender’s value (requires --times). An alternate value of T ...


1

If anybody runs across this issue I found a workaround. First, if you are on Windows and need to copy one bucket to another you can use s3cmd Express. I spoke with one of the developers of s3cmd and he mentioned that there are issues with the Linux/OSX version of s3cmd for huge buckets, so he told me to use Express if at all possible. Unfortanely I only ...


1

From your symptom, sync attempts were most likely unfinished due to slow link and the additional sync killing afterwards. In that case --inplace option is actually the worst option since it is not designed for network-bound situations. Quoting from the --inplace option: WARNING: The file’s data will be in an inconsistent state during the transfer (and ...



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