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0

Microsoft haven't really accommodated this and I don't think they are upto date with the current bios changes. This should be seem-less.


1

I have never been in a situation where I've had too many backups. You should have both hyper-v vhd backups and application/data backups. This will allow you to do the least disruptive restore possible, and recover from data issues without having to recover the whole VM. If yo have the case where the host fails you are covered there too.


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The volumes hosting the VMs contain a lot of things. The VHDs will be the bulk of that, but there will also be things which you don't need to back up, like the file reserved for paging the guest VM (if you have Dynamic Memory enabled.) Furthermore, if you just back up the volumes (and I doubt that's what Veeam is doing) then you get an image of the VHDs ...


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Based on your screenshot, something is terribly wrong with your setup. You have three disks, each configured as a RAID 0 logical drive. Therefore you have no redundancy and can't remove a disk without losing the data on it. Why was the server configured this way?


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Whenever the light is continuously burning amber, the drive is failed. You can remove the disk and put a new, identical, drive in. After about a minute the new disk will be blinking green, and the drive will rebuild if its configured as mirrored or RAID5. After 1 hour it will be Green and working again. Why are you removing the drive? Is the drive not ...


1

There are a few options for backing up databases like this, and assuming there's an easy mechanism to ensure consistency (temporarily halting the database/locking write access, etc), they're all roughly similar. The key thing (as Craig Estey mentions in his comment) is to use some mechanism to ensure what you write is consistent. There's not point backing ...


0

Use sshfs + rdiff-backup You will need to enable the DAG/rpmforge repos rpm -Uhv http://apt.sw.be/redhat/el5/en/i386/rpmforge/RPMS/rpmforge-release-0.3.6-1.el5.rf.i386.rpm yum update yum install sshfs rdiff-backup


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I think it uses a special backup type called "Snapshot Backup". From the SQL Server 2008 documentation: SQL Server snapshot backup is also used by Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS) and by all the backup software and storage software that uses this framework. For more information, see SQL Writer Service. It is all very ...


1

It sounds as the underlying disks are busy. The problem in restoring a large database is that each (group of) INSERT requires a flush/sync operation, which is very slow on mechanical disks (a 7200 RPM disk is in the order of ~100 IOPS). To hasten the restore, you had to temporarily instruct MySQL/MariaDB to not issue flushes/syncs. To do that, interrupt the ...


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If your underlying storage is plain old disks, for a 25GB-on-disk MySQL database, that's quite normal to experience hours-long restore - especially for some badly structured dbs (lots of tuples, indexes, etc.). For a start compress your dump, that saves tons of I/Os and puts less stress on cache memory : mysqldump foo |gzip >foo.sql.gz zcat foo.sql.gz ...


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In my case the issue turned out to be the NFS version. With NFSv4, uid/gid that did not exist at the server side were not allowed, whereas NFSv3 (as long as it was exported with no_root_squash) did not mind. So after I added vers=3 to the mount options in /etc/fstab rsync was able to chown just fine.


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I migrated some time ago mails from an hosting plan to my mail server merging mailboxes. As you I had a backup of maildirs that contains, in facts, a directory/files structure of your IMAP mailbox. If you do a ls -la into /home/backup/account1/Maildir you should see something like: # ls -la drwx------. 19 vmail vmail 4096 4 mag 18.15 . drwxr-xr-x. 3 ...


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Sorry for the delay but i find a solution for this problem. press window + R write msconfig and press enter go to boot tab and select "safe boot" and check "Network" press OK and restart now go to system property >change>check Domain >domain name>admin name & password . before restarting repeat 1 & 2 and change "selective startup" into ...


0

Just use a regular Windows Backup to a large enough storage. What kind of storage does only matter if backup speed is an issue.


-1

Windows 2008: Schedule a daily task with Robocopy script to /MIR the source folder. Test and read the /? before you run the script. Windows 2008 R2: Same solution as above, or use the built-in Windows Server Backup utility. R2 added support to save to network location. Add feature from Server Manager if it's not already installed. Robocopy does have more ...


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In newer Docker (tested in 1.9.1, build 9894698) you can use the cp command. Here is an example how to copy a directory from the container to the host: docker cp wordpress:/var/www/html backups/wordpress.`date +"%Y%m%d"`/ Here is an example how to copy a directory from the container to a tar file: docker cp wordpress:/var/www/html - > ...


0

For a fool-proof strategy you can try proxmox, so you virtualize your dedicated server and can take advantage of kvm virtualization if planning to use Windows os, or lxc for recent linux distro. Then you can easily snaphot each VM into external ftp/nfs + some 'ol good file level backup (attic backup, acronis, rsync, rsnapshot, rdiff backup, bacula, and so ...


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The system state backup (when done on a Domain Controller) includes AD schema/data. See here for more details.


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You can use this Robocopy command to backup data with incremental backup mode. SET source="Type you source path"; SET dest="Type you destination path"; robocopy %source% %dest% /S /COPYALL /NP /TEE /R:3 /W:3 /Log:c:\Documents\logs.txt



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