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I'm assuming this is at a hosting provider? The simple answer is it depends on their policy, but generally you would only pay for the 1Gb once when it leaves Apache, not when it leaves the NFS server. Most hosting providers only charge for data when it passes through their router, so traffic between two machines at the same provider is free. If you want ...


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It isn't showing 30 hops. It is just timing out after 9, this is usual on residential connections because either your ISP or your router is preventing ICMP pings. My guess is that your router would be either hop 10 or 11 on that otherwise. The outgoing connection determines the route. So when you are sending data to the server, your ISP is determining ...


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The Internet is designed to be robust and route you around problem areas. Finding you another suitable path should take so little time (milliseconds or lower) that you don't realize you've avoided congestion. It's only when none of the route choices are particularly good you start to see problems, and I'm spending some time in this answer so that it's more ...


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Packet inspection is much more affected by the packets per second than bandwidth. This is caused by the fact that it is much more CPU intensive to parse a packet, than to skip the payload. The metric used to measure this is called 'packets per second' or PPS. Some equipments have specialized integrated circuits called ASIC that can offload this processing ...


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There are numerous utilities to measure bandwidth speed on a Linux system. I recommend nethogs (#4) to measure the bandwidth of your application specifically. It doesn't matter what kind of network connection it is. Physical, VMware host-only network, VMware bridged network, etc. # ubuntu or debian (default repos) $ sudo apt-get install nethogs $ sudo ...



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