Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

You'll need a transparent proxy and/or a firewall behind your router. With this you can monitor and control your environment. There are hundreds of commercial and open source solutions for this.


0

What is a company user doing watching Netflix anyway! But seriously, this is not the kind of question where one can give you a definite answer as it depends largely what you want to do, what you consider valuable, what improves the business, etc. However, there are a few points worth noting here that can help you make your own decisions: As pointed out ...


0

I had a problem with my co.'s 20Mbit conection, shared between 25 people, that sounds similar. The ISP gave us an Ethernet connection from the MPOE, which we plugged right in_to the firewall, no router. That worked great for 18 months, then suddenly not very well. The connection would slow, to as little as 100Kps, then eventually recover for a while. The ...


2

Don't do it like that. People tie themselves in all sorts of knots trying to customise iptables exclusions, but it's not the right way to handle the problem. Instead, use the first-dispositive-match-wins logic of iptables to work for you. List the exceptions first: iptables -A INPUT -s 192.168.1.1 -p tcp [...] -j ACCEPT iptables -A INPUT -s 192.168.2.2 ...


0

There isn't nothing odd here. Your server receives HTTP requests, which are a few hundred bytes long at most. Meanwhile, the responses sent by the server are HTML pages, image files etc., which are at least a decade larger. You can have a closer look at HTTP bandwidth usage by running a log analyzer on your web server's access.log.


0

You didn't define the burst size. From man tc-htb : burst bytes Amount of bytes that can be burst at ceil speed, in excess of the configured rate. Should be at least as high as the highest burst of all children.


1

I may have answered my own question, at least partially. Apparently the FCC operates a site called the National Broadband Map which allows you to get a rough gauge of ISPs and their advertised bandwidth to an address. The output looks like this: Of course, it would be better to know their actual physical plant (OC3 lines etc), but this is a good start. ...


-2

Back in the mists of time, I heard about this tool: bing. It has some limits but it may be of help even though, of course, it needs to send some traffic through the links we are trying to determine the effective bandwidth of. Hope this helps!


2

Is this possible at all? No, this is not possible. By definition, measuring bandwidth requires actually sending/receiving traffic, and since networking gear has a finite amount of information it can pass in a certain time period, you will be consuming a certain amount of that finite resource. Sure, you could turn on QoS in your switch/routing gear and ...


0

If the far side is a webserver that you can at least upload an image to, you could upload an image with a known file size, then write a script on your client to download the image over and over and over again and record how long it takes for the file to be downloaded. With that time and the known file size, you could put together a relative bandwidth graph ...



Top 50 recent answers are included