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5

When specifying PTR records using the in-addr.arpa domain, the least significant part of the network IP address should come before the remaining parts, i.e., the reverse of the usual way of specifying IP addresses in dot-decimal notation. From Wikipedia article on Reverse DNS lookups Reverse DNS lookups for IPv4 addresses use a reverse IN-ADDR entry in ...


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In DNSSEC, the role of the root and intermediate nameservers are to provide a chain of trust until an authoritative nameserver for your zone is reached. Aside from hosting the public DS key associated with your signed zone, they have no role in NSEC3 validation. For NSEC3 to function, you need to sign your zone using an algorithm that mandates support for ...


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The glue records you have filed with your domain registrar do not match the nameserver records you have in the DNS zone. Your registrar has these records: Name Server: ns1.sysadmn.net 81.84.24.93 Name Server: ns1.gabrielsousa.com 37.59.115.115 While your DNS records show: producaoaudio.com name server ns1.producaoaudio.com. producaoaudio.com name ...


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Setup your local configuration/domain and add in named.local.options forwarders like this: forwarders { 208.67.222.222; //OpenDNS Primary 208.67.222.220; //OpenDNS Secondary }; Whenever your DNS server don't have the answer, it will forward the request to those servers.


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The immediate cause of error is the leading whitespace in your db.10 file. Correct: ; ; BIND reverse data file for local loopback interface ; $TTL 604800 @ IN SOA necacdnsone.necone.com. root.necone.com. ( 1 ; Serial 604800 ; Refresh 86400 ...


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First of all, I'm currently unable to reproduce the problem. I'm not sure if any of this actually answers the question (I'm not sure there even really is a clear question) but here is my take on what has been presented: named-checkzone is the tool appropriate for testing a zone file (named-checkconf is for the named configuration file). You should have ...


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He guys just wanted to update this to let you know what I found out for the solution. Under my Internal view the match-clients argument was messing me up. match-clients { internal_hosts; !external_slave; internal_slave; }; The internal_hosts acl includes the range 129.42.0.0/16. This was listed before the !external_slave; argument so it was picking that ...


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What you need are called glue records: What is a glue record? Essentially, without a glue record, your nameserver definition would be calling itself recursively; i.e., to resolve, ns1.mysite.com, first you have to resolve mysite.com, one step up.


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You can do this using $INCLUDE in your zone file, which will allow you to split the contents of the zone to multiple component files arbitrarily. See here for more info.


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dnsmasq will do this for you. Run it locally on your machine and set your /etc/resolv.conf to point to 127.0.0.1. I don't have the full configuration to hand but the parameters you probably want to investigate are # Do not read resolv.conf no-resolv # Send queries for contoso.com to nameserver 10.1.2.3 server=/contoso.com/10.1.2.3 # Set your local ...


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As long as the registrar allows you to add any valid DS record that you want to the delegation of your zone, the registrar will not be a factor. Some things that a registrar could do that would cause a problem is: if they do not allow you to add DS records whatsoever you simply cannot have a signed delegation at all (with DLV as a potential workaround), ...


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named is the process name used by the Bind DNS server which can be configured to operate as either authoritative DNS server, recursive resolver, both, or even just a cache between client and recursive resolver. The log message indicates that named has received a DNS query from the specified IP address and that named has refused to answer it. A response will ...


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Enable querylogs rndc querylog and parse your log files, like this: grep -Eo "client ([0-9]{1,3}[\.]){3}[0-9]{1,3}" /path/to/logfile | uniq -d client 10.0.252.1 client 10.0.231.15 client 127.0.0.1 excluding duplicates and adding | wc -l to count them, but don't mind to find a real solution that will be really accurate and simply. Using dnstop Capture ...



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