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11

If you are running a public accessible DNS server then other clients may be start using you. Maybe to use you as a public resolver or maybe to abuse your service for an DNS amplification attack. If you are not running a public server and have 127.0.0.1 setup as your resolver on that server: It's most likely queries your applications make to resolve ...


5

You have a problem with your serial number. In your live DNS zone the serial number is 2014122502. But in your new zone it is 3. Serial numbers can only be incremented; a serial number lower than the previous one will be ignored, along with all the records in the zone. Whenever you change one or more records in the zone, always change the serial number to ...


4

yes you can do this with bind views: http://www.zytrax.com/books/dns/ch7/view.html basically, you define each view as a subnet, and then each view maintains its own zone file. depending on the source ip/subnet of the dns query, you will get a different "view". this is common for name servers to use in an "internal"/"external" views, so as dns ...


4

Back in 1997, that would have been one correct SOA record interpretation of several. :) Things were a little more ambiguous back then. RFC 2308 reclassified the last field of the SOA record as the negative caching interval, otherwise known as the NCACHE field. RFC2308 §4 is the most applicable here. It not only redefines this as the NCACHE field, but also ...


4

In a nutshell: Forwarding: just passes the DNS query to another DNS server (e.g. your ISP's). Home routers use forwarding to pass DNS queries from your home network's clients to your ISP's DNS servers. For example, for foo.example.com, a forwarding DNS server would first check its cache (did it already ask this question before), and if the answer is not in ...


1

Your zone has a SOA of ., which your registrar may not be comfortable with. As a general rule, it's a bad idea to try to hijack . and there is no guarantee that your registrar's software will allow you to claim zone SOA that you don't actually operate. I recommend creating a single zone file and define a new zone stanza every time you need to register a new ...


1

This should be a process problem. Normally admins would add new records into the zone files of both views. Force them to use scripts if their memory is bad. Discipline them if they refuse to use the scripts. But if it's a madhouse and you just need this to work, I think you might be able to do this with view based response policies. Let's say you have ...


1

Almost. The soa record itself has a TTL of 86400 seconds, and depending on the server-side software that will be the default ttl for that zone. Individual records within that zone - such as PTR or NS - can have their TTL overridden. I believe that a recursive query for any individual DNS record will return with its own TTL, though I say that based on ...


1

The statistics of rndc stats are from the start of the named process until now. Running rndc stats does not reset them, they will just continue counting up. If you want to find out the monthly queries, you'll need to run rndc stats every 4 weeks and calculate the monthly number yourself.



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