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7

Yes, it's perfectly supported without any problem. You can even host completely distinct domains in the same machine. For example, using BIND9 as the DNS server you should put something like this in named.conf: zone "example.com" { type master; file "/usr/local/etc/namedb/static/example.com"; notify yes; allow-transfer { ...


4

It's illegal by RFC1912: RFC1912 2.4: "A CNAME record is not allowed to coexist with any other data." However RFC1034 only states that it "should not" be used. Which to me means that it's technically not illegal (RFC2119). You may use it if your DNS software supports it and you know what you are doing. There are however implementations out in the internet ...


3

First of all, it's important to understand what @ means. @ is a reference to the current origin value. By default the origin is the name of the zone but it can be redefined at any point in the zone file using the $ORIGIN directive (eg $ORIGIN foo.example.com.). This means that no general statement can be made regarding @ IN CNAME ... as the meaning depends ...


3

For option 2 you can set up a Conditional Forwarder for the Reverse Lookup Zone.


3

You specify ns.ggkthx.eu as a nameserver, but there is no A or AAAA record for ns.ggkthx.eu. Like: ns IN A 178.33.157.225 Hint: whenever you change your zone, first run named-checkzone on it. It will tell you such problems.


3

Because you didn't redact the domain name (thank you!), this one is hopefully simple: you are advertising two IP addresses under that A record: [madhatta@risby madhatta]$ dig carsizler.com [...] ;; ANSWER SECTION: carsizler.com. 38400 IN A 103.225.77.3 carsizler.com. 38400 IN A 103.225.77.2 Most browsers will ...


3

I don't think bind can easily do this, and for a very good reason: this is a horribly broken thing to do and you should find a better way of achieving what you want. I'm guessing you want a transparent proxy, so set up a transparent proxy, don't fuck up DNS. But if you really want to break DNS for your users, dnsmasq actually allows you to do this: dnsmasq ...


2

I agree with the other answer that points out that doing this kind of thing seems like a bad idea. However, I would think that the reason for your SERVFAIL responses is simply that the zone file for your . zone (as posted in the question) is invalid. An error that I immediately see is that the NS record refers to the name . but . has no A or AAAA records. ...


2

Your root zone, as shown in the question, does not contain any delegation information for edu, only an A record. By this definition edu is not a zone of its own but just a name that is part of the root zone. To match your description of what you want, the edu A record should not be in the root zone, instead there should be delegatory NS records + glue ...


2

Bind doesn't allow this, and for a very good reason - if you were to do this, then anybody anywhere on the internet could use your nameservers for any domain they chose. This would be splendid for e.g. a spammer who doesn't want their spam to be rejected due to nonexistent hostnames. You should use some form of script/program to generate the config file. ...


2

In general this is called "split DNS". You create a system where the DNS records seen outside the company are different than the DNS records seen inside the company. In particular, outsiders see www.example.com and other externally-visible hosts. Inside the company all machines have DNS records... these records are not seen outside. Pick an internal ...


1

You only posted the reverse zone "1.168.192.in-addr.arpa.". It would be useful to check your "example.com" zone file and make sure the A record are present. Posting an extract from the zone file will help. Knowing the actual domain will help troubleshooting. You might have some good reason not to share it. Note: (sorry if already obvious to you) Forward ...


1

No, I don't believe that the control channel has any means of fine-grained access control. One solution could be to implement a separate service that has rndc access and which has the desired user access control built in. (Eg some set of REST endpoints or whatnot that the clients can use.)


1

Sounds like you might be able to use the (otherwise rarely seen) DNAME record. For instance, in the internal.example.com zone: foo IN DNAME foo.bar.com. A query for xx.foo.internal.example.com would then return a synthesized CNAME pointing to xx.foo.bar.com.


1

I hate to post and then immediately post my own answer but when I was working on getting the DHCP client configuration and leases file I noticed about half a dozen lease entries. Just to create a clean file to post here I deleted that file and rebooted. After that it grabbed the proper DNS server info. While I feel there was more to it my solution was to ...


1

Certain versions of OS X assign preferences to DNS servers. This may cause your internal DNS server to be pushed down the preference order. Try running this command to find out which server is being used: scutil --dns | grep nameserver\[[0-9]*\] Sources: https://discussions.apple.com/thread/1660439 http://support.apple.com/kb/ht4030 ...



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