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As was noted by others, zone transfers from slaves do work assuming the slaves are configured to allow it. Regarding the method of performing a zone transfer, however, I want to note that AXFR (full transfer) would be a better choice than IXFR=0 (incremental transfer of changes since serial number 0). There are several reasons for this, first of all AXFR ...


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You can do this using $INCLUDE in your zone file, which will allow you to split the contents of the zone to multiple component files arbitrarily. See here for more info.


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What you need are called glue records: What is a glue record? Essentially, without a glue record, your nameserver definition would be calling itself recursively; i.e., to resolve, ns1.mysite.com, first you have to resolve mysite.com, one step up.


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The glue records you have filed with your domain registrar do not match the nameserver records you have in the DNS zone. Your registrar has these records: Name Server: ns1.sysadmn.net 81.84.24.93 Name Server: ns1.gabrielsousa.com 37.59.115.115 While your DNS records show: producaoaudio.com name server ns1.producaoaudio.com. producaoaudio.com name ...


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All Windows machines use SRV records in DNS to locate domain controllers. These SRV records have to be present on the DNS server that your Windows machine is looking at if you want the Windows machine to be able to locate the domain controller. In a traditional Active Directory environment, the domain controllers register and maintain their own SRV records ...


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It appears that the problem is that named is unable to write to the path /etc/bind/zones/mydomain.com (and the associated .jnl file). While it would be possible to simply make that path writable by the user which runs named, doing so would be somewhat unorthodox considering that this doesn't really fit with how /etc is normally used. Generally services ...


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Ok so the problem was because my zones were insite a "zones" folder, give permisions for the group to be able to write insite and problem solved


4

First, I'd like you to take a step back. Everyone is new at some point, but setting up authoritative DNS servers is not something that you should be attempting as an early system administration task. A great deal of your learning will come from making mistakes, and making mistakes with authoritative DNS puts your network in jeopardy. With the above in mind, ...


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From the logging section in the BIND manual: In BIND 9, the logging configuration is only established when the entire configuration file has been parsed. In BIND 8, it was established as soon as the logging statement was parsed. When the server is starting up, all logging messages regarding syntax errors in the configuration file go to the ...


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This is very easy to do: In AWS, create a hosted zone. Get the IPs of each name server (dig ns-1954.awsdns-52.co.uk -> 5.5.5.5) Create/Register your 4 name servers with your registrar Each domain should point to the aws ip (ns1.example.com -> 5.5.5.5) Next change the name server that the domain itself is pointing to. Use your new ones (ns1.example.com and ...


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This is not a Apache issue, or any redirect or anything DNS related. This is simply the fact that most browsers will hide the http:// part from URL in address bar, while will show https or some other protocol, if it is used, if you select all in address bar and paste in any blank field you will see http://www.this-example.com/ In Firefox for example, this ...


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Thanks for posting all of this info, it helped greatly. The Verisign tool errored out on: Query to yoda.ex-mailer.com/108.61.175.48 for ex-mailer.com/A timed out or failed The domain you're interested in is publishing two different NS records. ex-mailer.com nameserver = yoda.ex-mailer.com. ex-mailer.com nameserver = r2d2.ex-mailer.com. From my own ...


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A couple of days before the big move, you could push all traffic to CloudFlare, even a free plan would suffice. When the server is down for the migration, you could tell CloudFlare to display the "please come back later" page. Then, you could point CloudFlare to the new server when it's up and then switch the DNS off CloudFlare onto the new server, ...


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By defining the NS records below the delegation, you have inadvertently combined zone delegation and records within those zones in the same zone file. Try the following simplified config to prevent these warnings: $ORIGIN mydomain.com. $TTL 6h @ IN SOA ns01.mydomain.com. hostmaster.mydomain.com. ( ...


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In my case the problem was solved by only changing dnssec-validation yes; to dnssec-validation no;


3

named-checkconf -zj or reading your logs should reveal the reason for the SERVFAIL problem. In this case it appears that the SOA record in the zone file for your festmedhest.se is outside the zone.


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works when I removed $ORIGIN . from festmedhest.se.db.


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Well as you noticed the reason Bind won't start is because of the error condition returned by the pre-start check: /usr/sbin/named-checkconf -z /etc/named.conf. You'll need to fix that. The lonely tilde character ~ at the end of your zone file is not a valid resource record and should be removed. You're declaring an in-zone name-server: ...


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At least the NS entry needs an A or AAAA record (and most likely a dot at the end unless your nameserver is to be called benu123.com.benu123.com).


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The first thing to understand is that you're not the target of this attack. When recursion was enabled, nasty people found this in their network scans and your server was added to a list of attack nodes that were "willing" to assist them. Even though the vulnerability has been patched, you are now in a database of vulnerable servers that has been ...


1

Most certainly your server is trying to resolve 'target-express.com' and it is failing. The reason it is failing is the NS servers for 'target-express.com' are not properly setup. (Google 'lame servers'). Doing 'dig +trace' shows two NS records for the domain, but if you query those domains, there is no response. Now the question is who is querying your ...


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Could your DNS forwarders be forwarding requests back to the original server? If so this might be something like the problem I had last year (see Windows DNS servers repeatedly requesting records in zone when they get SERVFAIL response). Fix is to not have forwarding loops. This only shows up as a significant problem with zones that return SERVFAIL because ...


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It is perfectly alright to have a domain name/zone-file pointing to name-servers outside of that domain i.e. it is perfectly alright to use ns1.example.com as the name-server for the example.org domain. Not only means that you don't need Glue records in the example.org zone, it is often easier to administer as well. I think you made a slight conceptual ...


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It's not clear where do you run the ping. But your assumption that client tries to get the ip of the server from the master dns server is plain wrong. DNS client contacts the servers of /etc/resolv.conf and only these servers. The server makes a choice to respond in only one of these ways: if it is a master for the domain, it responds based on it's ...



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