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23

Not knowing what exactly your problem is, I can recommend pscp from parallel-ssh as a tool to upload small files to multiple servers. You prepare a list of servers to upload to and let it know what to take locally and where to put it remotely. For example: $ pscp -h list-of-servers file.torrent /tmp/ [1] 02:11:22 [SUCCESS] 10.0.0.21 [2] 02:11:22 [SUCCESS] ...


13

Is he authorized by his ISP to sublet the T1 to others? If so, then he is in effect a common carrier (like a phone company) and not responsible for the use of the service. As soon as he starts taking measures to prevent certain traffic he is assuming responsibility. I'd contact a lawyer before doing anything at all. If he isn't authorized by his ISP to ...


10

If each apartment has its own port on a managed switch somewhere in the building, seeing their traffic levels should be pretty simple with something like MRTG. However, this seems like more of a legal issue than a technical issue. IANAL, but by trying to police the connection the owner is essentially giving up any sort of "common carrier" status he might ...


8

I think most approaches that ask "How do I lock down X" are just plain wrong. It's badness enumeration. Now go downvote me but I think that you should (as you do with "normal" firewalls) just allow the traffic that matches known good traffic. But now you have a problem, SSL encrypted HTTP traffic isn't as easy to allow. There are solutions to it that are ...


7

It depends on how your network is laid out and where the bottlenecks are, but yes, it can be faster to use BitTorrent. In theory, instead of sending out 7 copies of the same files, your source server should only need to send out 1 copy, split among the receivers. By the time that happens, the remaining peers will have shared the parts they didn't receive ...


7

What you want is to use an imaging solution that can multicast the image to multiple clients. This way there is only one data stream containing the image that can be read by multiple clients simultaneously. You would PXE boot the clients, they would request the image from the server, then the server would begin sending a multicast stream of the image that ...


7

Most commercial firewalls only block incoming, they allow all outgoing and that is sometimes enough to get torrents working with minimal speed. If you need to block it, the best thing you can do is block all outgoing on the router, excluding items that are needed such as smtp, pop3, http, https. Also, block UPnP as this dynamically allows clients to assign ...


6

The best social solution I've seen is to give the letter to the tenants and after 3 notices terminate their internet service. Most complexes I've worked in have that policy and it works well. After the first or second letter you see their bandwidth usage drop significantly. Otherwise I wouldn't worry about it. He wont have the connection shut off for ...


6

Everyone here has already talked about the legality issues with this kind of setup, so I won't beat that dead horse more. If you'd like a good free tool for monitoring internet traffic, you might want to try IPAUDIT as it will give you pretty good information about your host's traffic use. I have a post in the following question (IPAUDIT is a Linux-based ...


6

There are several flags in a TCP packet (SYN, ACK, PSH, RST and FIN). These are normally used as part of the setup and tear down of normal TCP connections. One of the flags (RST) is used when there's been a problem with the connection and one end needs to abnormally abort the connection. When the other end receives a RST connection, it immediately tears down ...


6

Been there, tried that. Just won't work. In a SOHO environment, such as where I work, there is no way to tell what is P2P and what is "legitimate" traffic, as the gear we have just isn't that sophisticated. The only way I have found that's worth anything at all is a more "manual" way. My monitoring system (Nagios) alerts me when the traffic on the external ...


6

I would start by saying that you would want to avoid FTP and Bit Torrent. Bit Torrent is a great technology when many people have the file that you'd like and the download can be distributed amongst all of them (fast download of a linux ISO for instance). I would not recommend it for a simple site A to site B transfer. FTP is largely regarded as out-dated ...


5

Capsa Network Analyzer can group connections by protocol (including BitTorrent) and provides a wealth of information including throughput, a connection matrix (for remote/local network/peer mapping) and other expected packet sniffing capabilities. There's a tutorial here. To identify what file names are in the torrents I'd recommend capturing any requests ...


5

I would rather recommend plain old FTP. You get your directory listing for free as it's part of the protocol and people don't need an extra client, as all good browsers have a basic FTP Client built in. Only for uploading they need a FTP Program. BitTorrent will really get messy here, as people cannot just upload stuff - they need to create torrent files ...


5

Bittorent tracker is pretty easy to setup, I know couple of PHP-based, but they are mostly in Russian (TorrentPier - phpbb2 interface, TBDev). You also can also look at XBTT - written in C++ - it can manage millions of peers on single box, but web interface for it is kinda hard to find. UPD: I've found this project xbtit they offer it for free under BSD ...


5

Deep packet inspection is the way to go here. The traffic has to be examined in order to block it effectively. If encryption is used, though, all bets are off. You might try looking at Untangle. It sounds like it could do what you want.


4

You could use a Squid proxy server or a Smoothwall firewall appliance. These would work because traffic shaping needs to use "deep packet inspection" to detect the protocol type. If you cant figure out how to block the traffic then you have 2 more options: Limit bandwidth by IP Limit number of inbound connections by IP (that would slow Torrent to a ...


4

I'm going to have to be really negative about this... Trying to fight Bit Torrent the technical way is going to lead to a lot of headaches for near zero efficiency. Bit Torrent can be encapsulated in SSL on port 443 making it no different then browsing an HTTPS website. The only solution is to talk to the people and get them to slow down or just stop...


4

Enable QoS on your DD-WRT stuff as described here. Make all non-port-80/22/25/IMAP/POP traffic limited to some very small amount of bandwidth, and make even those ports limited to something reasonable like 2Mb/s or so. Then go read BOFH for ideas about what to do to the offending users.


4

You're right, it really is a social problem that needs to be addressed by management. If certain people are impacting the network to the point that it's causing problems for others, then they need to be dealt with and explained what the consequences will be if they keep it up. Reprogramming the MAC addresses on their NICs? If they have no legitimate need ...


4

The obvious way to keep it private is through use of firewalls and not publishing the tracker outside of your office. Trackers themselves do need to be published, as I remember. The basic problem that BitTorrent is solving is how to get thousands of people to efficiently download at high speed from a point source on the Internet. The bottleneck in this ...


4

There are two benefits of bittorrent: Files are distributed and therefore less likely to go away. Fast file transfer thanks to many people serving a file. In a LAN the connection is usually the limiting speed factor, not the server. The benefit of distributed files is often not needed because there is usually a reliable server. Bittorrent is quite bad ...


4

There is a ton of poor data in this question. Bittorrent works with a "tit for tat" scheme, wherein clients that are uploading get preference in downloading. To upload data, other clients need to be able to connect in to you, which can't happen if you're NATed or firewalled off. Thus, you open ports to allow other clients to connect in, you upload some ...


3

The advantage of BitTorrent over other file distribution tools, say rsync, is that clients start to offer their data to the other clients, so if the server has a slow connection to the clients, throughput will be much better. BT is a protocol which is designed for global sharing, though. So you will have to find a means to lock out all other clients but the ...


3

My preferred method is to configure the client to throttle itself. This seems to be the most simple and effective method. Almost every client supports it; I use the ancient ctorrent client and even it support dynamically configurable throttling via the CTCS extension. If the client or managing user refuses to do so, and social engineering fails, I run ...


3

BitTorrent is great for distributing files where you don't need a big server (farm) hosting the file, as clients also become servers and as the popularity of the file grows, so does the capacity for distributing the file. This is where the brilliance of BT lies, and why it is a very good for low/no-budget operations to distribute data to a large "audience". ...


3

You can define a blacklist for different files. All you have to do is blacklist .torrent files. But in reality you should have a decent firewall capable of blocking Bit Torrent ports... Any firewall will do this with a bit of configuration and tweaking. If you really don't want a firewall, you could always use an IDS such as Snort to watch the traffic and ...


3

You did not mention how many machines will be in your "mesh" for bittorrent; if it is going to be ony a few, then bittorrent may not be worth the trouble of setting up the torrent files and getting them to people, plus running the tracker. I think of this also from time to time and always come back to BT's real use; sharing files on the Internet where ...


3

BitTorrent is probably not the best thing because a) The biggest problem is not having many torrent files, but making them searchable. b) They have to use a software which is probably not that easy to use for your relatives. I would recommend you to look at an online storage service like e.g. Wuala.



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